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463 




PORTRAIT OF AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 
IN HIS FORTIETH YEAR 
BY KEN YON COX 

Tins reproduction is made troni tlic original picture painted in the sculptor's 



Thirtv-sixth Street studi 



and destroyed in the fire in his studio m 



Cornish, X. H., in IQ04. A replica was painted hv Mr. Cox in 1908 for the 
Memorial Exhibition in the Metropolitan Museum. The sculptor is repre- 
sented at work upon the relief portrait of William M. Chase. Behind hi.s 
head, to the left, is a photograph of one of the Vanderbilt carvatids. .A cast 
of the "Unknown Lady" of the Louvre stands beyond. Next is the bronze 
relief of Homer Saint-Gaudens as an infant, and beyond that the plaster 
relief of Miss Lee. The scaffolding behind the easel is the back of the Shaw 
Memorial. 



AUGUSTUS 
SAINT-GAUDENS 



BY 



C. LEWIS HIND 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 

JOHN LANE COMPANY 

MCMVIII 



BOSTON UW!Ve??SiTY 

IOILEGl Cf LIBERAL ARTS 
LlBBAfiX 



Copyright 1908 by 
JOHN LANE COMPANY 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



/\0 HUirf I 
of 



PRESS or BEDFIELD BROTHERS, NEW YORK 



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I' 



I 



TO 
RUTGER BLEECKER JEWETT 

AND OTHER FRIENDS MADE 
IN AMERICA 



PREFATORY NOTE 

This book on Augustus Saint-Gaudens is divided into four sections: 

1. His Life: Chronology. 

2. An Essay. 

3. His Works: Chronology. 

4. Photographic reproductions showing the development of his art 
from his first production to the last. 

I am indebted to Mr. de W. C. Ward for permission to include 
many of the photographs he has prepared for an editioti-de-luxe portfolio, 
giving the sculptor's entire achievement. Also to the editor of the official 
catalogue of the Memorial Exhibition held at the Metropolitan Museum, 
New York, a model catalogue in thoroughness of detail and arrangement. 

New York, 1908. C. L. H. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PORTRAIT OF AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS IN HIS 
FORTIETH YEAR. BY KENYON COX 

WILLIAM MAXWELL EVARTS 

WILLIAM GEDNEY BUNCE 

RODMAN DE KAY GILDER 

DOCTOR WALTER CARY 

DOCTOR HENRY SHIFF 

JOHN S. SARGENT, R.A. 

CHILDREN OF PRESCOTT HALL BUTLER 

ADMIRAL DAVID GLASGOW FARRAGUT 

MISS SARAH REDWOOD LEE 

SAMUEL GRAY WARD 

HOMER SHIFF SAINT-GAUDENS 

MRS. STANFORD WHITE 

PROFESSOR ASA GRAY 

DOCTOR HENRY WHITNEY BELLOWS 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

AMOR CARITAS 

DEACON SAMUEL CHAPIN ("THE PURITAN") 

WILLIAM MERRITT CHASE 

CHILDREN OF JACOB H. SCHIFF 

GENERAL WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN 

KENYON COX 

WASHINGTON MEDAL 

DOCTOR JAMES McCOSH 

JULES BASTIEN-LEPAGE 

ADAMS MONUMENT, ROCK CREEK CEMETERY, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

DIANA 

CHARLES COTESWORTH BEAMAN 
GARFIELD MONUMENT, PHILADELPHIA 
MEMORIAL TO ROBERT GOULD SHAW 
DETAIL FROM THE SHAW MONUMENT 
PETER COOPER 

PETER COOPER, HEAD OF BRONZE STATUE 
WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS AND MISS HOWELLS 
CHARLES ANDERSON DANA 
JOSEPHINE SHAW LOWELL 

HORACE GRAY, ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE UNITED 
STATES SUPREME COURT 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON 
MR. AND MRS. WAYNE MAC VEAGH 

MONUMENT TO GENERAL WILLIAM TECUMSEH 
SHERMAN 

SHERMAN MONUMENT: LATER STUDY FOR THE HEAD 
OF VICTORY 

THE PILGRIM 

PLAQUE COMMEMORATIVE OF THE CORNISH CELE- 
BRATION, JUNE 23, 1905 

SIX PLASTER MODELS FOR THE UNITED STATES NEW 
COINAGE 

WHISTLER MEMORIAL AT UNITED STATES MILITARY 
ACADEMY, WEST POINT, N. Y. 

STUDY FOR THE HEAD OF CHRIST 

AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS, FROM PHOTOGRAPH BY 
de W. C. WARD 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

HIS LIFE: CHRONOLOGY 



1848 Born in Dublin, Ireland, March ist. Father, a Frenchman, 
came from Aspet in Haute-Garonne, Pyrenees, a few miles 
from the town of Saint-Gaudens. Mother, a native of Dublin. 
When Augustus, one of several children, was six months old 
the family emigrated to America. Lived for three months in 
Boston, then settled in New York. 

1 861 At the age of thirteen Augustus was apprenticed to Louis Avet, 
cameo cutter, said to be the first man to cut cameos in the 
United States. 

1864 Quarrelled with Avet and left his employment. 

1864-7 Worked with Le Brehon, cameo cutter. Studied drawing at 
night during his apprenticeship — four years at Cooper Union, 
two years at National Academy of Design. Towards the close 
of this period he produced his first work, a portrait bust of his 
father. 

1867 Went to Paris to study sculpture. Petite Ecole; aged nineteen. 

1868-70 Paris. In 1868 he entered Jouffroy's studio in the Ecole des 
Beaux Arts. Self-supporting, working half his time at cameo- 
cutting. Mercie, a fellow-student ; Falguiere and Saint Mar- 
ceau had just left. 1868 was the year of the Universal 
Exposition, when Paul Dubois exhibited his silvered bronze, 
Florentine Singer, which had been awarded the Medal of 
Honour in 1866. This work exercised a strong influence on 
contemporary sculptors and on Saint-Gaudens. Paul Dubois, 
who was nineteen years older than Saint-Gaudens, was one 
of his lifelong friends and admirers. 

1870-2 Rome. On the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, Saint- 
Gaudens moved from Paris to Rome, where he remained for 
three years, associating with the French prize-men of the day, 
of whom Mercie was one. In Rome he produced the statues 
Hiawatha and Silence. He also experimented in painting, 
making studies of the Campagna. 

1872 Returned to New York in the winter of this year to model a 

bust of William Maxwell Evarts, which was put into marble 
in 1874. 

1873 Rome, where he remained until 1874. 

1875-7 New York. Studio in German Savings Bank Building. 

xi 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

1876 Received commission for the Farragut monument. 

1877 Married Augusta F. Homer, of Boston. 

1877-8 Paris. Member of the International Jury at the Universal 
Exposition. 

1879 Rome. Flying visit. 

1879-80 Paris. The Farragut exhibited in plaster at the Salon of 1880, 
also several medallions. Position assured. 

1880 New York. Studio at Thirty-sixth Street. 

1884 Received commission for the Shaw monument. 

1885 Took a house at Cornish, New Hampshire, as a summer 

residence. Mr. and Mrs. Saint-Gaudens were the first settlers 
in this artistic and literary colony. 

1887 Lincoln statue unveiled. 

1888 General Sherman gave Saint-Gaudens eighteen sittings for his 

bust. 

1 89 1 J Jams monument. Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington. 

1893 Designed medal for the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago. 

1897 Shaw monument unveiled in Boston. 

1897) Paris. Worked on Sherman group. Officer of the Legion of 
1900) Honour. Corresponding Member of the Institute of France. 

1900 Medal of Honour, Paris. Illness; returned to America, bringing 
the Sherman with him. Operation at Boston. Settled perma- 
nently at Cornish, N. H. He finished the Sherman, and, in 
spite of ill-health, produced, during the latter years of his 
life, among other works, the seated figure of Lincoln, the 
Parnell, the Phillips Brooks for Boston, the models for the 
allegorical figures in front of Boston Library, a seated figure 
of Christ with attendant angels, and the designs for the new 
coinage. 

- 1901 Special Medal of Honour, Buffalo. The medal was designed by 
Mr. James E. Eraser. 

1903 Equestrian statue of General Sherman unveiled at the entrance 

to Central Park, New York. 

1904 Elected Honorary Foreign Academician of the Royal Academy, 

London. The following were among his other distinctions: 
Member of the Society of American Artists, which he had 
helped to found; Member of the National Academy of New 
York; Member of the Academy of St. Luke, Rome. Honorary 
degrees from Harvard, Princeton and Yale. 

xii 



HIS LIFE: CHRONOLOGY 

1904 His studio at Cornish caught fire. Models, drawings and 

sketches were burnt, also bric-a-brac and paintings, inclu- 
ding his portrait painted by Bastien-Lepage. Saint-Gaudens 
was in New York at the time. 

1905 The Cornish residents presented a gold bowl to Mr. and Mrs. 

Saint-Gaudens to commemorate the twentieth anniversary 
of their coming to New Hampshire. A masque, with seventy 
performers, was played in the grounds. 

1907 Died at Cornish, after a long illness and much suffering, on 
August 3d. He worked almost until the end, often being 
carried to his studios to superintend the work of his assistants. 

On February 29th, 1908, a memorial service in honour of Augus- 
tus Saint-Gaudens was held in New York. 

A memorial exhibition of his works was opened in March, at 
the Metropolitan Museum, New York. 



Xlll 




AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

AN APPRECIATION 

I 

IE LEFT the world a little better than he found it." 
With these true and temperate words the voice of the 
speaker ceased. There was no applause, as this solemn 
assembly in honour of the memory of the first American 
sculptor of genius was in the nature of a sacred rite; 
but the hush of sympathetic appreciation that stilled all 
the trivial movements of the large audience was more 
eloquent than any quick manifestation of approval. We felt that the 
sobriety and taste of the peroration, as of the whole memorial oration, 
by Mr. McClellan, Mayor of New York City, was in harmony with the 
lite-work of Augustus Saint-Gaudens. This lay service of gratitude for 
the gift of a significant life was held on the 29th of February, 1908, in 
the city of New York, where Saint-Gaudens lived and worked for so 
many years; where so many of his triends remain; which he had known 
so well, and upon which he has left the impress of enduring beauty and 
exemplary achievement. His Sherman and his Farragut rise nobly 
above the swirl of New York, standards to which others must strive to 
attain, the high-water mark of modern sculpture. 

On August 3, 1907, death had released him from long-drawn-out 
suff^ering. He worked almost to the end at his home in Cornish, New 
Hampshire, for to him working and living were synonymous terms. 
His brain still continued to plan and design when, too weak to walk or 
to use his hands, he was carried across the garden from house to studios 
to direct and counsel his assistants who were making enlargements from 
the models of his last works that, in spite of bodily pain, he had been 
able to complete in the peace of the uplands of New Hampshire. 

In the intervening months since his death comrades and friends, 
with Mr. Daniel Chester French as controller, had been collecting 
originals and casts of his work and arranging for a memorial exhibition 
to be held at the Metropolitan Museum. The lay service was a prelude 
to the opening of that exhibition. Never before, I think, has sculptor 
been so honoured; never before, in my experience, has the spiritual 
presence of an artist whose place is empty seemed so near as during 
those two hours consecrated to his memory with music, poetry and 
quiet-spoken words of afi^ection, praise and prophecy. The harmonies 
of Chopin's Funeral March swelled from lamentation into the passages 
of triumph as if the heart of the composer were crying: "O Death, where 
is thy sting!" And as the tamiliar music quickened our senses, the 
white cast of one of the sculptor's creations, a standing virginal figure 
with upraised wings and hands rising from the back of the dais in a 
tracery of flowers, seemed to submit a spiritual communication from 

XV 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

him to us. This young figure, this Angel of Peace, Love and Purity, he 
modelled again and again for the commemoration of fresh sorrows, 
making in each essay slight alterations, as if saying: "I can change the 
blossoms, but not the structure of roots and stems — those are integral 
and unalterable." One of the early reincarnations is familiar to all — 
the Amor Caritas of the Luxembourg Gallery. The last I saw the 
other day in St. Stephen's Church, Philadelphia, embedded in the wall 
by the chancel, still and white, a monument to a girl who died young, 
and the words engraved on the tablet held aloft by this angel, into whose 
face has crept a sweeter radiance and in whose girdle you note some 
fresher flowers, are: "Blessed are the Pure in Heart for they shall see 
God." 

When the quartet played certain numbers from Beethoven, Bach and 
Schubert, the echo of his presence in the hearts of many listening friends 
must have been very insistent, for Schubert's Quartet in D Minor, 
Bach's Air from Suite in D, Beethoven's Quartet in F Major, op. 59, 
had often been his choice on those musical Sunday afternoons in his 
big white studio in Thirty-sixth Street. As I did not know Saint- 
Gaudens in life, the music of his choice brought the man no nearer to 
me; but when my eyes travelled downward from that white angel among 
the flowers on the dais to the seated, shrouded figure reproduced on the 
cover of the programme, I felt that his art, which was so essentially the 
expression of himself, reached its profoundest expression in this 
woman, shrouded and quiescent, without name or inscription, so 
detached, so content with her loneliness, who sits awaiting an ultimate 
awakening in the cemetery of Rock Creek above the city of Washington. 

II 

"He left the world a little better than he found it." 
Take the word "better" in its widest acceptation and can we say 
more for any man, woman, child or dumb creature that has lived and 
died .? Art is not divorced from life, as certain shrill prophets would have 
us believe. It is a part of life, like the movement of clouds, the ways of 
insects, the energy from food, and the idea of righteousness. Art is life 
in life, and the part can tincture and sanctify the whole. The artist by 
being himself, his best self, can make the road for others living long 
after him not only smoother but a highway of recurring joys. We walk 
our stages of the journey and the best that we assimilate comes often 
from the letters written to us in terms of paint, print and marble by 
those whose insight and power of expression are greater than our own. 
We take the sustenance that our souls need, and as we grow in knowledge 
the food should also become finer, rarer and simpler in quality, as in the 
case of a learned Greek archaeologist and lecturer of my acquaintance, 
who knows all there is to be known about Greek sculpture — a past 
master in it — but whose voice drops only into a reverent intonation 
when he speaks the name of the austere Scopas. Some, doubtless, have 

xvi 



AN APPRECIATION 

found sustenance in Canova and Hiram Powers. If those academic 
and uninspired craftsmen have helped others to live; if they have given ' 
one moment of relief from sorrow or boredom, one thrill of joy, then 
Canova and Hiram Powers have left the world a little better than they 
found it and to them let honour and thanks be rendered. 

Ill 

All great art is simple and any attempt to analyze the effect of a 
work of art upon the beholder should be simple. May we not just ask 
ourselves these questions: Does it quicken the emotions.? Does it stir 
the slumber of the soul .? Does it spur the brain .? Does it open a window, 
as Jan van Eyck opened an early fifteenth century window to the beauty 
of the world of landscape art, although he did not dare to make Our Lady 
and Chancellor Rolin look through it at the winding river and little 
islands .? Does it add something to our lives which we cannot find for , 
ourselves, or which, having once found, we have lost in the stress and 
obsession of daily details ? Does it give the thrill of the glory of a sunset 
seen suddenly through a window after a day of cloud, the mental joy 
of a piercing passage in Shakespeare, the ecstasy of a Mozartian melody, 
the inward comprehension of the mystery of life on hearing a child say 
its first prayers in its mother's arms ? Remembering the street sculpture 
that, with certain brilliant exceptions, reduces thoroughfares and in- 
teriors in the Old World, as well as the New, to a level of almost incon- 
ceivable platitudinous ugliness, the answer, as regards the average 
level of modern sculpture, must be in the negative. There is Httle to 
choose between England and America. England has her terrible monu- 
ments crowded in Westminster Abbey, America has her awful efiigies 
of chosen sons crowding one another in the National Hall of Statuary 
in the Capitol. We have our execrable Achilles in Hyde Park, our eye- 
sores of Stephenson in Euston Road, Cobden in Kentish Town, and the 
monument to Queen Victoria in High Street, Kensington, at which even 
the drivers of omnibuses jeer. You have your — but a guest must be 
courteous. I would gild my criticism in the form of an interrogation. 
Has any American citizen ever derived one instant's pleasure or 
encouragement from, say, the Horace Greeley planted against The 
Tribune building, frock-coated Roscoe Conkling in Madison Square, 
Washington Irving in Bryant Park, or the full-sized cast of Michael- 
angelo's egregious David in the park adjoining the Albright Gallery at 
Buffalo ? When a classical model is borrowed, it should be chosen from 
the master's highest achievement. 

The "American Society of the Fine Arts," which is about to extend 
its sphere of influence, should agitate for a law to the effect that no 
piiblic monument shall be erected in honour of the dead which does not 
minister to the pleasure of the living. 



xvn 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 
IV 

The answer as regards the work of Augustus Saint-Gaudens is in 
the affirmative. Naturally it does not always pass the test. Since the 
nameless draughtsman of the quaternary period engraved the mam- 
moth on the wall of the cave of Combarelles, the artist has not lived who 
would be awarded full marks in such an examination. Saint-Gaudens 
produced so much in his torty years of working life (glance over the 
pages of the chronology of his works), and sometimes a commission was 
not entirely sympathetic to him. Sometimes in modelling a bust or a 
relief of one who was no longer living he had only a photograph for 
guidance. Occasionally his work lacks that raison mystique of which 
Maeterlinck speaks; occasionally it does not evoke emotion in the 
beholder. I am cold before his Peter Cooper seated heavily in the em- 
brasure of a heavy canopy by the Cooper Institute. The figure is 
picturesque in its uncouthness, but it lacks the splendid sense of per- 
sonality that distinguishes the Lincoln. The mere idea of Lincoln is an 
inspiration in itself. The idea of Peter Cooper, admirable citizen and 
good man, does not inspire us, and it did not inspire Saint-Gaudens. 
The artist must feel before he can express. Perhaps it is the canopy, in 
which the sculptor was assisted by Messrs. McKim, Mead & White, 
that deadens my appreciation of the Peter Cooper. If this be so, it is the 
single instance in which that remarkable firm who collaborated with 
Saint-Gaudens in the architectural setting of many of his monuments, 
and to whom New York and America are indebted for a series of 
beautiful buildings, failed to add a distinguished architectural setting 
to the sculptor's design. But with the exception of Peter Cooper and a 
few others, such as the Garfield in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, the 
many works of Saint-Gaudens triumphantly answer the question : " Do 
we give pleasure to the living.?" 

If I were asked to catalogue the works by him from which I have 
derived the keenest delight and which continue to delight, I would name 
the Sherman, the Farragut, the Lincoln, the Shaw, the figure in Rock 
Creek Cemetery, the Puritan, the Pilgrim, the series of standing angels 
to which the Amor Caritas belongs, and among the reliefs, the Butler 
Children, the Schiff Children, the Bastien Lepage, the little Homer 
Saint-Gaudens and the early Robert Louis Stevenson, not the memorial 
in Saint Giles's, Edinburgh, which is too large, but the original small 
relief in rectangular form, showing the head and foot ot the bed, that 
long bed, the long lines of the figure, the long, sensitive face, seemingly 
doomed but happily reprieved, and on the background the winged 
horse, the ivy leaves and berries, and the verse ending: 

" Life is over, Life was gay. 
We have come the primrose way." 



XVllI 



AN APPRECIATION 

V 

I count myself fortunate in having, by the chances of travel, reached 
the point of approach to the work of Saint-Gaudens suddenly. He came 
almost newly to me. Nothing was discounted by advance paragraphs 
and studio discussions. I saw two of his finest works, the Sherman and 
the Farragut, for the first time on the day of my arrival in New York. I 
walked up Fifth Avenue and encountered with a thrill of joy Sherman 
the soldier riding to victory, signalling a paean of triumph among the 
trees at the south entrance to Central Park. I walked down Fifth 
Avenue and found Farragut the sailor, balancing himself as if still 
standing upon the quarter-deck of his good ship, comfortably grounded 
in Madison Square. I looked up above his bluff, strong face, high up 
through the brilliant clarity of the light that makes New York, five out 
of seven days in the week, one of the pleasantest winter resorts in the 
world, and there, on the pinnacle of the Garden tower, was slim Diana, 
one of Saint-Gaudens's few nudes, " Diana of the Cross Winds," as she 
has been called, shooting an imaginary arrowat the Flatiron Building that 
dominates the windiest corner in all New York. One grows very fond 
of this little Diana (she is many feet high), as she is always present and 
always contented and pretty. I see her from the roorn where I write 
these lines, a beautiful silhouette against a luminous white cloud, poised 
on her pinnacle, ready to shoot and fly away, not in the least disturbed 
at the gigantic marble tower 658 feet high, with 48 stories, "the highest 
office building in the world," that will overtop but will not subjugate 
her. She recalls, too, the labour of infinite pains that Saint-Gaudens 
always gave to his work. Perfection was his only goal. His artistic 
conscience knew no rest even after a work was cast in bronze, unveiled 
and placed in situ. He was never satisfied, and so fearful of letting 
anything but his best go forth to the world that many experiments never 
left his studio. 

He desired to alter the Shaw monument that rises from the terrace 
above Boston Common. Permission was refused; but he worked again 
upon the original sketch, remodelled the floating figure of Death or 
Fame and replaced her at a different angle. One day he announced 
his determination to refashion the drapery of the figure in Rock Creek 
Cemetery, and desisted only when his assistant, Mr. Fraser, said: "You 
may make it different; you cannot make it better." After Diana had 
been placed on the tower in Madison Square Garden he came slowly 
to the conclusion that the figure was too large. Stanford White con- 
curred, so Diana was taken down, at their own expense, and replaced 
by the present smaller version. 

VI 

Subjective impressions may, or may not, be of interest to the 
reader, but the greatness of the subject or theme may excuse the record 
of them. 

xix 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

When I recall the various impressive, startling, interesting and 
amusing episodes of my five months' sojourn in America, the dominating 
impression is of my first glimpse of Saint-Gaudens's Sherman, the 
colour of gold, a happy warrior in the flush of his "vigourous and 
eccentric years," eager, intent, his stern face touched with idealism, 
symbolically marching through Georgia to the sea, localised by the 
broken pine branch beneath the horse's feet, led by Victory, laurel- 
crowned, bearing a palm branch, man, horse and Victory sweeping 
onward "that the Union might be saved, and that then forever there 
might be peace." Here is inspiration for the youth of America; here 
Art passes from the exhibition room into the arena of life, where shine 
the unsoiled fabrics of which immortal things are made. Saint-Gaudens 
wished to place this group, his ultimate great work, the last canto, as 
Mr. McClellan finely called it, of his epic of the Civil War near Grant's 
tomb on Riverside Drive. The authorities decided otherwise, wisely I 
think. It would be hard to imagine a finer site for this incentive towards 
ideal patriotism than the widening land where the palaces of Fifth 
Avenue merge into the pleasances of Central Park. There, on an oasis in 
the traffic, Sherman rides eternally forth to Victory. 

In journeying about New York one often passes the Sherman, and 
always at the sight of this fusion of the real and the ideal, the seen and 
the unseen, the real warrior and the warrior's ideal — Nike-Eirene — the 
heart leaps as to a war chant, or to great deeds told in great verse. 
There is an extraordinary suggestion of a light-footed forward movement 
in the advancing group: the travail of the way is forgotten in the glory 
of the mission. The feet of the Victory seem hardly to touch the ground, 
and the inspiration of her presence, the aura ot her spirit, sweeping out 
from her unfurled wings, sweeping forward through her outstretched 
arm, touch and refine the clay of horse as well as ot man to something 
rich and rare. It is that uncommon thing in art, an ideal made concrete 
and actualwithout loss of verisimilitudeandwithno hint of sentimentality. 
This lyrical epic in bronze honours the dead and delights the living. 
Incidentally it pleads for colour in public monuments as sanctioned by 
the ancients from Phidias to Jan van Eyck. Who will deny that the 
group gains greatly in beauty from the two layers of gold leaf that Saint- 
Gaudens placed upon it, and, if we are to judge by the Marcus Aurelius 
on the Capitoline Hill, the weathering of the centuries will but add to 
the charm of its patina ? 

VII 

"Whatever you do, have the appearance of doing it without toil," 
was the sage counsel given to the gentlemen of Urbino's court. The 
Sherman bears no more hint of the signs of toil than when Tetrazzini 
warbles Donizetti, yet no fewer than eleven years of study and 
alteration passed before the group was unveiled on Decoration Day, 
1903. For three of the years the sculptor was ill; but he worked upon 

XX 



AN APPRECIATION 

it, more or less, for eight, and he told a friend he estimated that it cost 
him three years of actual labour. An important article in the Century 
Magazine (March, 1908) by his son, Mr. Homer Saint-Gaudens, who 
is to write the oflficial life of his father, supplies interesting details of the 
work done by the sculptor on the Sherman during the last years of his 
life. When he left the hospital in 1900 and settled at his country home 
in Cornish, his first serious occupation was "the completion" of the 
Sherman monument. I must quote a few lines from Mr. Homer Saint- 
Gaudens's article to show what the word "completion" signifies: 

"At this time (1900) one cast of the Sherman stood in the Paris 
Exposition, while a plaster duplicate had gone to the French foundry. 
My father, however, still dissatisfied with the result, and yet dreading 
a trip abroad, set up a third replica in Cornish, and engaged assistants, 
in order to send his alterations to Paris, where they might be inserted 
in the bronze. And here, in a shed placed around the statue to keep 
out the snow, but not the cold, he remodelled sections of the cloak until 
he enlivened it with a possible floating movement. He modified such 
portions of the Victory as her wing and her 'Germanic' hair at the back 
of her neck. He emphasized the tiny angles and stiff marks of age upon 
the horse to increase the nervous snap. He restudied the mane, and, at 
a fortunate suggestion of an assistant, lifted the end of the tail. And 
he changed the oak branch on the base to one of pine. . . . 

"But the troubles with the Sherman were not over after these [and 
other] alterations. My father betrayed too great an interest in this 
combination of the real with the ideal to let the statue escape him then. 
So he set up the bronze himself in the field back of his house, to the 
delight of the farmers, that he might experiment with a pedestal and 
supervise the application of the patina." 

VHI 

Lest it be thought that my enthusiasm for the Sherman is too un- 
bridled, I give myself the pleasure of quoting Mr. Kenyon Cox, who 
has written much, always with insight and knowledge, on Saint- 
Gaudens. Some years ago he expressed the conviction that the Sherman 
monument is third in the rank of the great equestrian statues of the 
world, the first tv/o being Verrocchio's Colleoni and Donatello's Gat- 
tamelata, a handy piece of criticism, as it has been used as an original 
commentary by almost every writer and speaker on Saint-Gaudens. In 
his latest essay on Saint-Gaudens {Atlantic Monthly, March, 1908), 
Mr. Kenyon Cox writes: "To-day I am not sure that this work of an 
American sculptor, just dead, is not, in its own way, equal to either 
of them." 

IX 

Taste and sobriety were the characteristics of Saint-Gaudens's 
work. He had a horror of the melodramatic, or extremes of any kind. 

xxi 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

His prepossession was with grace, sweetness, spirituality, refinement, 
whatsoever you choose to call his essential quality. Emotion in marble 
made no appeal to him. I believe he was quite out of sympathy with 
the passion and pathos of Rodin's later work. He was a draughtsman, 
a designer, who expressed himself with equal feeling for the ensemble 
whether he worked in the round or in relief. He was a true impressionist 
who saw a work as a whole before he began, and who kept the im- 
pression before him until the end. Although he laboured at detail, he 
always strove to keep the detail subservient to the ensemble. In studying 
his work we feel that it is completely under control, impulse is chastened 
by consideration. He was an eclectic with, if the term be allowed, more 
individualism than eclecticism, yet he never allowed his individuality to 
master the temperament of his sitter. Facile cleverness he abhorred. 
He avoided mere realism, desiring to mould what he selected from life 
into a pattern framed by the artist's vision. How the temperament 
of this silent and sagacious man was evolved from a French father and 
an Irish mother, with Paris as his art pedagogue, and New York, still 
a little raw in those days, as the scene of his working years, I leave to 
students of heredity to determine. 

X 

If we agree that personality is the life-giving principle in art, the 
essence which produces the aesthetic and spiritual aura of great work, 
it should not be difficult to find a word to express the personality of 
every significant artist. Recall a great name and his epithet should trip 
to the tongue — the splendour of Titian, the curiosity of Leonardo, the 
mysticism of Blake, the taste of Whistler. For Saint-Gaudens I would 
coin a compound, and speak of his austere-sensitiveness. His artistic 
antennae explored the nature of his model, while his austerity re- 
strained him from dwelling overmuch on the intimacies that he had 
discovered. This sympathy is well shown in such divergent pieces as 
the Doctor Shiff ot 1880, the Miss Sarah Lee of 1881, the Professor 
Asa Gray of 1884, the Dr. Bellows of 1885, the Bastien Lepage of 1880, 
the Mr. and Mrs. Wayne MacVeagh of 1902 and the Phillips Brooks 
of 1907. 

Consider his five heroes of the Civil War — Farragut 1880, Lincoln 
1887, Shaiu 1897, Logan 1897 and Sherman 1903. How individual they 
are, how minutely and delicately felt, yet how large in conception. 
Even the General Logan, which his most sympathetic critics agree in 
dispraising, can be defended on the ground that the sculptor could not 
escape from the fact that he had to render the bravura and braggadocio 
of "Black Jack Logan." It is difficult for an artist working for his 
living, as well as for fame, to refuse commissions that he may feel are 
antipathetic. 



XXll 



AN APPRECIATION 

XI 

But Farragut was a man after his own heart, although I suspect 
that bluff sailor would chortle at sight of the delicate designs of the 
pedestal upon which his effigy stands, and would smile, the way of a 
ship upon the sea being his particular knowledge, if he could be told 
that the seat curving round his monument is shaped like the classic 
elliptic exedra. You must see this monument in situ; indeed, the only 
way to study a monument is in the place for which the sculptor and 
architect designed it. The very back of this sailor, hard-trained, equal to 
any fortune, is the very symbol of them that go down to the sea in ships, 
that back rising doggedly above the curt command engraved beneath, 
"Stick to the Flag." Farragut faces the street, standing easily,but firmly, 
seaman fashion, the real man towering above the dainty unreality of the 
pedestal of New River bluestone compact of fancy and imagery. A 
sword, plunging down through the waves, is flanked by figures in low 
relief of Courage and Loyalty; and the arms ot the seat are formed by 
the curving backs of dolphins. On the ground beneath are pebbles of 
the beach, and embedded in them is a bronze crab, on whose back may 
be read the half-obliterated name of Stanford White, who collaborated 
with the sculptor in the architectural setting. I can never pass this 
monument. I must always pause. Others too. One snowy night I 
watched a ragged Italian family forget cold and hunger in their interest. 
The mother and the children listened while the father explained in soft 
Italian the merits of the American sculptor's work. 

XII 

The Italian father passed his fingers affectionately over the low 
relief figures of Courage and Loyalty on the pedestal of the Farragut 
statue. Perhaps he, as a remote descendant of that wonderful period in 
Florence when rare Donatello, and those others whose names are like 
flowers, worked in low relief, felt some dim ancestral memory stir. 
Perhaps the Italian lather, like others whom I could name, enjoyed 
these soft figures in low relief more than the sturdy statue of Farragut. 
Low relief to many has a peculiar fascination, appealing more as a 
method of drawing than of modelling, and demanding from the artist 
a far greater sensitiveness in the rendering of light and shade than work 
in the round. The title sculpture has even been denied to low relief: 
it has been claimed as a form of graphic design in stone or metal, so 
akin to painting that connoisseurs of the Renaissance would hang reliefs 
and paintings together. 

Saint-Gaudens was intrigued with low relief. Indeed, he may be 
said to have revived the art which flowered in the era of Donatello to 
such a degree of delicate beauty that certain Florentine low reliefs seem 
Hke whispers in marble, so elusive that sometimes one fancies a breath 
will blow the delicate modelling away. Think of Donatello's Youthful 

xxiii 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

St. John in the Bargello, and his head of a cherub in the cathedral at 
Florence; of Mino da Fiesole's Madonna, Child St. John; and in the 
round of Andrea della Robbias's Bust of a Child in the Bargello, and 
Desiderio da Settignano's bust of Marietta Palla Strozzi in the Berlin 
Museum. 

Saint-Gaudens attempted and nearly always succeeded in his 
many experiments in this art " standing between sculpture and painting," 
from lowest relief to the highest, from the Bunce and Cary heads, 
pictorial and tentative, made in Paris in 1877 and 1879, to the con- 
summate mastery of the Shaw memorial; from the simple head of his 
infant son to the command of composition shown in the Butler and Schijf 
children. 

XIII 

How does a bronze low-relief portrait group look, usurping the 
place of a picture in a modern drawing-room ? I was fortunate in seeing 
the relief of the Butler Children in its rightful place in the house of the 
mother of the two little boys whose young beauty it perpetuates, enclosed 
in the hammered oak frame designed for it, hanging on the wall of a 
panelled room above a wood fire which cast shifting reflections upon the 
patina of the bronze. No picture could seem more suitable to the place, 
or give a more enduring pleasure than the surfaces of this low relief, 
hiding and revealing themselves under the influences of the ruddy light 
from the fire and the pale light from the window. Saint-Gaudens, like 
Romney, was an instinctive maker of beautiful patterns, a man who 
saw life picturesquely, who knew it, and who confessed that he had ''to 
fight against picturesqueness." Whatever he may have fought against 
and omitted in making this relief, the result is charming, an alluring 
picture of child life, two little boys in Highland costume, the elder 
holding his arm affectionately over the shoulder of the younger, the two 

hands clasped. r u- t. 

Equally pleasing is the low relief of the Schijf Children, of which 
a marble replica hangs in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan 
Museum and a bronze reduction in the Luxembourg Gallery. The 
figures of the little boy and girl are knitted together by the graceful 
lines of the shaggy greyhound's body. They are in the marble and yet 
not of the marble; they draw one to low relief, the most difficult of all 
sculptural methods, making, even when not particularly well done, an 
appeal more intimate than sculpture in the round. 

XIV 

In one of his essays Mr. Kenyon Cox says: "I beheve Saint- 
Gaudens the most complete master of relief since the fifteenth century." 

Since the fifteenth century! Yes! The fifteenth century still stands 
unapproachable. In appraising the work of Saint-Gaudens, distin- 
guished modern, whose genius has isolated him, and who was the first 



XXIV 



AN APPRECIATION 

sculptor in America to vitalise the art, there may be a temptation in 
our pride in his prowess to overemphasize his achievement. Art never 
dies, it slumbers only, reawakening when a child of genius is born to 
influence and educate his contemporaries, and by his achievement once 
more to spill that blessed word Renaissance over the pages of art 
histories. The achievement of the ages in sculpture is so tremendous 
that there is hardly an era since civilization began when we cannot say 
of examples of plastic art: "These are unapproachable." You can say 
it half a dozen times during one afternoon in any museum in the world. 
I said it yesterday at the Metropolitan Museum of New York standing 
before a series of sculptors' small models, heads, torsos and feet of 
queens, birds, etc., made 2,500 years ago — perfect; before a Greek low 
relief of a Toiing Horseman of the fourth century B. c. — perfect; before 
a bronze Panther rolling on its back, early Imperial Roman — perfect. 
One has only to close the eyes and make memory pictures of master- 
pieces by craftsmen of Egypt, Assyria and mighty Greece; of Gothic 
figures carved by unknown craftsmen for cathedrals when sculpture and 
painting were the handmaids of architecture; of works by Donatello and 
Michelangelo, to be reminded that a modern must be very gifted to 
stand up among these great memorials of the past and win any meas- 
ure of our approbation. 

XV 

Again and again has Saint-Gaudens been called a child of the 
Italian Renaissance, to which he was drawn through the example of 
certain French sculptors, through the virile Rude, maker of the Marseil- 
laise group on the Arc de Triomphe, through Dubois, and in a lesser 
degree through Chapu, Carpeaux and Mercie, who heralded what I 
suppose I must call the midnineteenth century French Renaissance in 
sculpture. Claux Sluter, Pilon, Goujon, Houdon and Pigalle do not 
seem to have influenced these Frenchmen much. Their eyes pierced 
back to Italy in her lovely youth of art where around the miraculous 
Donatello, early and later masters group themselves, or follow on like 
flowers in a garden walk, each beautiful in itself, each ofl^ering its 
perfume to the aroma of that supreme flowering time — Jacopo della 
Querela, the della Robbias, Ghiberti, Desiderio da Settignano, Bernado 
and Antonio Rossellino, Mino da Fiesole, Benedetto da Majano. When 
in 1867 Saint-Gaudens, a youth of nineteen, went to Paris to study art, 
sculpture was awakening from one of its recurrent slumbers. Ardent 
spirits had cast off the shackles of pseudo classicism, broken away from 
formal or informal reverence for second-rate antiques, those smooth 
nymphs with pitchers and smoother angels with harps, coy Venuses and 
heroic personages doing nothing trivially, all the dreary statues that 
block the corridors of a bored academicism. Instead, they looked at 
Donatello and his kin, and, looking, had the inspiration to do what 
Donatello did, what all strong souls do at the appointed time — to make 

XXV 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

that return to Nature that recurrently revivifies art. Saint-Gaudens 
arrived in Paris in 1867. The year before Paul Dubois's Florentine 
Singer had received a medal of honour in the Salon. In 1868, the year 
of the Universal Exposition, Saint-Gaudens saw the Florentine Singer 
at the Exposition. That statue we are told "marked an epoch for him 
as it did for modern sculpture." The new movement had begun. Saint- 
Gaudens crossed the threshold of classicism and stepped out into the 
radiant air of the return to nature. Paul Dubois, nineteen years his 
senior, became his friend and remained his friend for life. Falguiere 
and Saint Marceau had just left Jouffroy's studio. Mercie was his 
fellow-student. Saint-Gaudens participated in the excitement, saw 
visions and began to prepare himself for the visitations of the muse. 
One wonders in what direction his art would have evolved had he never 
gone to Paris, but remained in America; had he never seen the Florentine 
Singer, never met those ardent young French sculptors and shared their 
enthusiasm. 

XVI 

In a way he was more fortunate than his companions in Jouffroy's 
studio. He was already a craftsman, and he was able to support himself 
during those four years of study in Paris by his trade of cameo-cutting. 
As a boy he had served six years' apprenticeship to two cameo cutters 
in New York, "one of the most fortunate things that ever happened to 
me," he said in later lite. From his practical knowledge of the art of 
gem-cutting and the years he spent studying drawing at the Cooper 
Union and at the National Academy of Design in New York, he came 
to Jouffroy's studio equipped with a practical knowledge, and with 
habits of close application, that made a splendid foundation for his 
imaginative flights of later years. The collection of his works at the 
Metropolitan Museum contained a glass case showing a photograph of 
him at the age of seventeen seated at his work table, looking up from 
the cameo which he has been cutting. In the case were topaz and onyx 
brooches that he had carved in those long past days, the first steps of the 
small craftsman who became a great artist. It is a long journey from 
minute work upon a topaz brooch to the large and masterly achievement 
of the Sherman memorial. What effort, what striving towards perfection 
hide in those forty years! 

XVII 

Surveying this life of loved labour, I see it in three divisions, which 
I will call Prelude, Interlude and Postlude. 

The Prelude ends with his first visit to Rome in 1870 at the age 
of twenty-two, whither he was driven from Paris by the outbreak of the 
Franco-German War. The Interlude extends from 1870 to 1900, thirty 
years of activity and absorption in his art. The Postlude begins in 1900, 
when he returned from Paris an ill man to settle in Cornish, where he 
remained, with occasional visits to New York, until the end came in 1907. 

xxvi 



AN APPRECIATION 

As regards the Prelude and Interlude, there is little to add of 
external interest to the bald details given in the chronology ot his life 
printed in this volume. His youthful productions, a bust of his father 
made when he was nineteen and the bust of William M. Evarts, sug- 
gestive of Roman influences, produced after his return from Italy, are 
not noteworthy; they betray neither originality nor temperament. 
Neither do his marble statues oi Hiaivatha and Silence, completed before 
he was twenty-four, show promise of the distinction of his later achieve- 
ment, although some may detect in the Silence a foreshadowing of the 
figure in Rock Creek Cemetery. Any competent and industrious young 
man could have produced them; but there was promise in the Angels 
Adoring the Cross, in high relief, for the Church of St. Thomas, New 
York, unfortunately destroyed by fire. A man of no professed religious 
belief, he did his best work when the subject was invested with a 
mystical or spiritual significance. Then some slumber of flame within 
him leaped up and kindled that "something more" into his work which 
makes art significant. From actual flame and fire he suffered in spirit 
and in pocket. In addition to the group in St. Thomas's Church, his 
Angels on the Tomb of ex-Governor Morgan were consumed by flames, 
and in the disastrous burning of one of his Cornish studios in 1904 
there perished models, casts, drawings, household furniture, bric-a-brac 
and paintings, including the prized portrait that Bastien Lepage had 
made of him. 

The end of the first decade of the Interlude period was crowned 
by the low relief of the Butler Children, and the unveiling of theFarragut, 
which proclaimed him a master. 

XVIII 

The years between 1880 and 1900, which saw the completion in 
1887 of the Lincoln and The Puritan, and the Shaw ten years later, were 
interlude only as the life of man may be called an interlude between 
two eternities. Those were strenuous years. As if with prevision that he 
would die all too young, he would bewail, one of his intimates tells me, 
the brief time there was to do all that he meant to do. He was a reticent 
man, talking little in company, not averse to Bohemian gatherings, but 
filling the part of onlooker rather than participator. I have heard him 
described as a nevrose, but with his nerves well under control; often 
indifferent to opposition, but capable of sudden outbursts, as when he 
ground a plaster medallion beneath his feet when the criticism of the 
subject had irritated him to exasperation. Work calmed him. An 
assistant tells me that sometimes he would arrive at the studio in a state 
of suppressed nervous excitement, but that the moment his hands 
touched the clay and began to shape and press the material, he would 
gradually become quite calm and intent. One of the intimate friend- 
ships of his life was with Robert Louis Stevenson, who sat for him in 
New York when delayed in that city by illness on his way to the 

xxvii 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

Adirondacks in 1887. The Puritanic, mystical part of Stevenson, com- 
bined with his charm, ease of expression and the range of his frohc 
imagination, fascinated Saint-Gaudens. He was forever quoting him, 
the prayers as well as the poems. Readers of the "Letters" know what 
Stevenson thought of "My dear godlike sculptor." Stevenson's 
philosophy of happiness in the shadow of death must have affected 
Saint-Gaudens, who disliked speaking of death, although suggestions of 
our common end by symbol or by implication are not infrequent in his 
works, but always as triumphant or consolatory, never, as in Albert 
Diirer, as a menace. 

XIX 

It was in 1887 when he knew Stevenson intimately that he produced 
The Puritan, a statue in which he has expressed not only the personality 
of a type, but also the spirit of a world-moving movement. If any 
modern effigies deserve the appellation great, this statue is in the category. 
I saw it on a day of deep snow, standing dourly on its little hill in 
Springfield, the very essence of rigid Puritanism. Its correct name is 
Deacon Samuel Chapin, who was one of the founders of Springfield, 
but the world has agreed to call it The Puritati. A bust Saint-Gaudens 
made of Chester W. Chapin, a descendant of the deacon, served as a 
model. 

Eighteen years later, in 1905, he was asked by the New England 
Society of Pennsylvania for a replica to be placed in Philadelphia. The 
sculptor consented, but gave them more than the contract demanded. 
The new statue was to stand against the City Hall, conterminous to the 
traffic, not on a hill above the sight-line, as at Springfield. The sculptor, 
taking the model in hand again, made certain changes which he deemed 
necessary for its new environment. The head was remodelled and 
changed, the flying cloak was altered, the hand grasping the cudgel was 
advanced and the Bible was reversed so that the lettering "Holy Bible" 
was seen. Thus The Puritan, sojourning for years in the craftsman's 
brain, shaped itself into The Pilgrim. 

Saint-Gaudens, as I have said, also wished to change a detail in 
the Shaw Monument, but the alteration in the position of the figure of 
Death or Sleep was made from the original model. The bronze relief 
at Boston remains as it was when unveiled in 1897. It is the most 
learned and accomplished of his works — he gave to it twelve years of 
labour. Some of the heads he remodelled many times, and no one can 
look at it without wonder at the characterization of the rapt negro 
faces. This black regiment, the light of a sudden patriotism trans- 
figuring their faces, sweeps impetuously forward, led by their commander, 
Colonel Shaw, to a death that is to give all, through the genius of the 
sculptor, immortal life so long as bronze lasts. 

Above floats the symbolic figure clasping poppies and a laurel 
branch to her breast, interknitting, at this supreme moment, the two 

xxviii 



AN APPRECIATION 

races. The relief, framed in old trees, stands on a terrace built out from 
the roadway above Boston Common just beneath the State House. 
Even to those ignorant of the life and death of Shaw and his faithful 
band of the despised race, and there are some such who pause and 
gaze at it, this concrete symbol of devotion to a cause provokes tears 
which are all the more poignant because they will not flow. Perhaps it 
is the sight of that compassionate angel, the bearer of poppies, who 
knows the end and loves the brave condemned, that makes this martial 
monument so affecting. 

XX 

The period which I have called Postlude began when Saint- 
Gaudens settled in Cornish in 1900. He had still some fruitful years of 
work which were bestowed upon the completion of the Sherman for 
New York, the reconstruction of the Stevenson for Edinburgh, and the 
production of the Seated Lincoln lor Chicago, the Caryatides for the 
Buffalo Art Gallery, the Whistler Memorial for West Point, the Parnell 
for Dublin, the allegorical groups for the Boston Public Library, the 
Phillips Brooks Monument, the Baker Monument and the designs for 
the new coinage; but he knew in his heart that death was but delayed. 
She tarried nearly seven years. 

The Postlude period brings me, a stranger, near to him, as shortly 
before the opening of the exhibition of his works at the Metropolitan 
Museum, it was my privilege to spend a few days at his Cornish home. 
1 roamed through his haunts, lingered in his studios, and sleighed over 
the beautiful upland country which he loved. It was good to hear of the 
enjoyment he derived from open air relaxations — skating, skeeing, 
tobogganing and sleighing. More than once he turned out the whole 
studio of assistants, crying: "Sculpture isn't in it with tobogganing." 
His son has published in the Century Magazine extracts from two 
letters he wrote to friends in Paris expressing his newly aroused love for 
the out-of-doors: 

" I would never have believed it, nor do I suppose you will believe 
me now, but I am enjoying the rigorous young winter up here keenly. 
Snow over all, sun brilliant and supreme, sleighs, sleigh-bells galore, 
and a cheerfulness that brings back visions of the halcyon winter days 
of my boyhood. 

"We skate, and I play games upon the ice as I played them thirty- 
seven years ago. I am a little more stiff, but that makes no difference, 
since 1 still feel young. ... It is very far from the terrible, black, sad 
days of the winters of London and Paris, and even New York." 

When the shadow of the end began to stretch towards him, I do 
not think that he found the twilight so gloomy as he imagined it might 
be in the days of his robust health. The downward ways to the valley 
were gradual, and the desire to work continued through the vicissitudes 
of that via dolorosa. When too weak to stand, he would sit by his 

xxix 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

assistants sketching his ideas upon a pad; when too weak to sit, he 
was carried in an improvised sedan chair from one studio to another, 
where he rechned on couches directing and suggesting. Inward con- 
solation came to him, as to all fine spirits. I think I realized what that 
consolation was as I sat in a room of his Cornish home, surrounded by 
mementoes of his presence. 

XXI 

I sat in the room at night with the flames from the wood fire inter- 
mittently revealing the objects. Sometimes, when a log fell and the 
blaze leaped, I could distinguish hanging on the wall of the next cham- 
ber the portrait that John S. Sargent painted years ago of Mrs. Saint- 
Gaudens and their son Homer. 

I sat in the room at night and three heads steeped the atmosphere 
with their presence. The first was his own portrait, a reproduction of 
which is printed as the last illustration to this volume, a strong, beautiful 
face, a noticeable head, doer as well as thinker, touched with the sadness 
that marks the lineaments of all who create, wrestling to release beauty 
of form or of the fancy from the stubborn storehouses of the world. 
The eyes are small and piercing, the forehead square, downward 
stretches the straight Greek line from brow to nose, of which he made 
amusing use in a caricature he drew of himself. 

The second head was a study of the Victory of the Sherinan statue, 
and from it there seemed to shine a refulgence as if the parted lips were 
proclaiming the ultimate triumph of spirit over matter. I looked from 
this head to the head of the man who fashioned it, and in the silence of 
the room the ancient promise of victory over the grave seemed new, as 
if just uttered. 

Then I turned to the third head — a head of Christ. This and the 
low-relief plaque of his wife were the last pieces of sculpture worked 
upon by Saint-Gaudens with his own hands. The everlasting appeal that 
the life of the Founder of Christianity makes to all, whatsoever their 
shade of religious belief, or unbelief, may be, is so universal that it is 
with no surprise we learn that during his long illness the sculptor 
brooded with, I imagine, gleams of mystical elation upon that life, and 
strove to express all he felt of its beauty, wonder and pathos with the 
means of expression nearest to him — his craft. On the tables of the 
room were books interpreting the life of Christ, and in his working- 
studio across the lawn I was next day to see his monument to Phillips 
Brooks wherein the standing figure of Christ plays so significant, so 
touching a part; and another memorial, commissioned by a bereaved 
family, where Christ is seated beneath hovering angels whose hands 
are folded in prayer. 

XXII 

In one of the studios which I visited next day his assistants were 
enlarging certain models. Standing on a platform rising and spreading 

XXX 



AN APPRECIATION 

out like a gallery above the entrance to the studio was the figure of 
Phillips Brooks, large, domineering, the left hand grasping a Bible, the 
right raised in exhortation. Three fingers, without a hand, without an 
accompanying body, rest upon and caress his left shoulder. A few feet 
away stands the figure of Christ. By himself the man looks too dramatic ; 
by himself his Master looks too ideal. But when I saw a model of the 
two figures placed together under a pillared canopy, I had a quick 
object-lesson in Saint-Gaudens's genius for merging the real and the 
ideal, for touching the clay with spirit, for giving a work something of 
that unseen world of mystery which encompasses our material activities. 
You see the preacher, the man, the fighter for Christ, and if you look 
very closely, you also see in the shade of the canopy, resting three 
fingers upon the shoulder of this modern shepherd of his flock, the 
figure of his Lord with veiled head, sufi^ering yet not sorrowful, that the 
sculptor's fingers had hardly ceased reverently to fondle, when his 
spirit was released. 

XXIII 

In his private studio the personality of the sculptor seemed even 
closer. Approaching it I made a little detour, and saw, far below, in the 
lower part of the groves of Aspet, the altar with the columned canopy 
which served as a background for the masque played by the residents 
of Cornish on June 23, 1905, to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of 
the year when Mr. and Mrs. Saint-Gaudens first made their summer 
home in New Hampshire. A golden bowl was presented, and the 
sculptor designed a plaque in low relief to commemorate the celebration, 
which he purposed to perpetuate in marble. I passed on to the studio, 

fiausing to admire a reproduction of a section of the Parthenon frieze, 
aintly coloured, decorating the wall of the loggia, from which a view 
outstretches over the New Hampshire Highlands. I entered the studio, 
which is unchanged, untouched since he last sat there. In fine weather 
the wide doors would be thrown apart; he loved sun and air; he loved 
swimming in deep pools, and the sound of running waters. 

I saw copies of certain great memorials of the past with which this 
eclectic of fine taste liked to surround himself — Michelangelo's The 
Eternal Creating Man, Donatello's St. George, and the naive portrait of a 
Mother and Daughter of A. D. 79 from the villa of Boscoreale, near 
Vesuvius; and among modern things an etching of himself by Zorn, 
and a group, modelled by Sargent, of a portion of his Dogma of the 
Redemption in the Boston Public Library. Behind a screen I saw a 
bronze head, corroded, severed from the body, one of the few objects 
saved from the fire in 1904. It seemed familiar, intimate as a face one 
has known for half a lifetime, but I did not at once realise that it was 
a cast of the head of the woman in Rock Creek Cemetery, known as 
the Adams Memorial, the hooded, brooding figure that some call 
Nirvana, some The Peace of God, but to which the sculptor gave no 

xxxi 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

name, that semiconscious figure, the sad music of humanity still moaning 
in her ears, contemplative but not complaining, awaiting the Awakening, 
resigned to the stillness of the pause which is her present Eternity. 

XXIV 

I sat in the silent studio, and recalled the day when I went out 
from Washington to seek this monument in Rock Creek Cemetery. It 
is not easy to find; indeed, I have heard of some who have sought and 
have failed to discover her, hidden in a clump of pines, laurels and 
evergreens. The background of the statue, a plain granite slab, faces 
outward. It is half hidden in the trees which arch above it and tangle 
about the base. There is nothing upon this obverse side of the monument 
but two intertwined laurel wreaths, with a row of bound sheaves be- 
neath, suggesting, perhaps, that they who sow in tears shall reap in joy. 

One might pass that way and fail to perceive the little path that 
admits to the cloistral bower where she sits. I pushed my way through 
the hedge of foliage, and entered this little open-air temple of silence 
and reconciliation. All was very still. No sound from the outside world 
reached to this fastness. I ascended two steps and stood upon a hexa- 
gonal paved plot, with a massive stone bench filling three sides of the 
hexagon. On the fourth side sits the nameless figure — waiting. 

XXV 

I saw her again, in a cast, among the sculptor's collected works 
at the Metropolitan Museum, New York, still holding her secret close, 
still emoiivant even without the architectural setting, the protecting 
trees and the surrounding solitude. I did not see her immediately on 
entering the sculpture-hall for facing me towered the heroic figure of 
Lincoln, that consummate work wherein, for the first time in history, 
•T the frock coat has been forced to garb a personality with beauty and 
romance. It is idle to say that it was impossible for a sculptor to fail 
with such a subject as Lincoln. Some have failed; others have been 
successful in varying degrees, but only Saint-Gaudens has caught the 
very idea of the national and beloved hero, the rugged power and 
sweetness of the face, the emotional angularities of the long body, and 
the sense of will controlled by simple nobility of character. Does he not 
seem to be waiting to utter the words that are inscribed on the pedestal: 
"Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith let us to 
the end dare to do our duty as we understand it " ? 

Still grander looks the statue in Lincoln Park, Chicago, of which 
this is a cast, for there the idea of an audience chamber is suggested 
by a circular stone exedra, sixty feet across, vv'hich surrounds the low 
pedestal; but at the Metropolitan Museum it was not difficult to imagine 
that the whole of the vast hall was his audience chamber, and that we 

xxxii 



AN APPRECIATION 

were under the influence of his spirit as well as of the spirit of the 
sculptor who inspired the clay and made it Lincoln. 

From the standing Lincoln I turned to Lincoln seated in his arm- 
chair, the head lowered as if in thought, modelled twenty years later; 
thence to the allegorical groups for the Boston Library, rough but 
instinct with character and idealism; thence to the plaster models for 
the new coinage, delightful designs, but which required a considerable 
reduction of the relief before practical use could be made of them; 
thence to Mr. Kenyon Cox's portrait of him, working, the happy artist, 
twice happy, doing the work he loves, and leaving the world better for 
that work. 

I looked around for a final survey of his achievement, ranging 
from the head of his father, his first work, to the head of Christ, his last; 
from the minute cameo brooch cut by the boy to the stupendous 
Sherman modelled by the man in his prime; from the small plaque of 
Bastien Lepage to the heroic figure of Lincoln; from the light-touched 
gaiety of the Sargent medallion to the learned mastery of the Shaw 
monument; from the formal and uninspired Silence of 1871, with finger 
on lips, to the subtlety of the eloquent and inspired Silence of i8gi in 
Rock Creek Cemetery — proclaiming the sure and silent evolution of 
the artist. 

Let the rest be silence — and gratitude. 



XXXiU 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 



[In the following pages an attempt has been made to record chrono- 
logically all the works produced by Augustus Satnt-Gaudens from 1867 
to 1907. / am indebted for information to members of the sculptor s family, 
to his friends and assistants, and to the official catalogue of the Memorial 
Exhibition.^ 



His Father, Bernard P. E. Saint-Gaudens 1867 

Bronze bust. 15 in. high. Signed and dated. 

Miss Belle Gibbs . 1870 

Miss Florence Gibbs 1870 

Hiawatha 1871 

Marble. Seated figure. 

This early work, which had been lost sight of for fifteen 
years, stands on the lawn of a house near Saratoga 
Springs, N. Y. 

Fisher Boy 1871 

Statue. 

Edward W. Stoughton 1872 

Marble bust 

Edwards Pierpont 1873 

Marble bust. 

Mrs. Pierpont 1873 

Marble bust. 

Silence 1874 

Marble statue. Heroic size. Masonic Temple, New 
York. 

William Maxwell Evarts 1874 

Marble bust. Saint-Gaudens's first commissioned portrait 
bust. 

Theodore Dwight Woolsey 1 875-1 879 

Marble half statue, dated 1 875-1 879. Yale University. 

Benjamin Greene Arnold 1876 

Marble bust. 

XXXV 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

Fresco Painting 1876 

Trinity Church, Boston. 

Henry E. Montgomery, D.D 1876 

Bronze medalhon. Church of the Incarnation, New York. 

George W. Maynard 1877 

Bronze plaque. SJ x 5I in. 

David Maitland Armstrong 1877 

Bronze plaque. 7x4^ in. 

William L. Picknell 1877 

Bronze plaque. 7! x 4I in. 

William Gedney Bunce 1877 

Bronze plaque. 6| x 5J in. 

Angels Adoring the Cross 1878 

Groups in high relief in collaboration with John La Farge. 
St. Thomas's Church, New York. Destroyed by fire. 

Miss Helen Maitland Armstrong 1878 

Bronze plaque. 6^ x 5I in. 

Charles F. McKim 1878 

Bronze plaque. 72 ^ 5 in. 

Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Charles F. McKim and Stanford 

White (Caricature) 1878 

Bronze medallion. 

Richard Watson Gilder, Wife and Infant Son 1879 

Bronze plaque. 8| x 17 in. 

Rodman Gilder 1879 

Bronze plaque. 132 x 15! in. 

Le Roy King Monument 1879 

Slab with oak branches carved upon it. Newport, R. I. 

Emilia Ward Chapin 1879 

Bronze plaque. 92 x 6 in. 

Dr. William E. Johnston 1879 

Bronze plaque. 9! x 61 in. 

F. D. Millet 1879 

Bronze plaque. 102 x 6| in. 

xxxvi 



HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 

Dr. Walter Gary 1879 

Bronze plaque, gf x6| in. 

There is also a variation of this relief without the hat. 

Miss Maria M. Love 1879 

Bronze plaque. 9fx6fin. 

Dr. Henry Shiff 1880 

Bronze plaque. lof x iij in. 

A reduction is in the Luxembourg. 

John S. Sargent, R.A. . 1880 

Bronze medal. 2| in. diameter. 

Tomb of Ex-Governor Morgan 1880 

Three angels at the foot of a Greek cross rising above the 
tomb. The height of the entire monument was 40 feet. 
These figures were destroyed by fire at Hartford 
(Conn.) Cemetery, while the models were being put into 
marble. They were the first of the series of figures re- 
peated with variations in the Amor Caritas, the angel on 
the tomb of Anna Maria Smith, at Newport, and the 
memorial to a young girl in St. Stephen's Church, 
Philadelphia. 

William Oxenard Mossley 1880 

Medallion and bust. 

Prescott Hall Butler's Two Children 1881 

Bronze. Low relief. 24 x 35I in. Dated 1880-1881. 
On the wall of Mrs. Butler's dining-room, in New York, 
in an oak frame designed by Stanford White. 

Admiral David Glasgow Farragut. Unveiled 1881 

Madison Square, New York City. 

This was the first statue commissioned from Saint- 
Gaudens for a public place. It was modelled in Paris, 
exhibited in the Salon of 1880, and unveiled in New 
York in 1881, "marking an epoch in American sculp- 
ture and decorative art." Signed and dated Paris, 1879- 
1880. 

M. McCormick 1881 

Plaque. 

Leonie Marguerite Lenoble 1881 

Plaque. Circular, about 9 in. 

Mrs. Charles Carroll Lee and Miss Lee 1881 

Bronze plaque 14^x23! in. 

xxxvii 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

Miss Sarah Redwood Lee 1881 

Bronze plaque. 

Josiah Gilbert Holland 1881 

Bronze plaque. i5§xio|in. 

Samuel Gray Ward 1881 

Bronze plaque. i8|xi4g in. 

Saint-Gaudens considered this one of his best reliefs. A 
reduction is in the Luxembourg. 

Two Caryatides 1881 

For marble mantelpiece in the house of Cornelius Vander- 
bilt, New York 

Sculpture Decoration in Villard House, New York .... 1882 

Homer Saint-Gaudens 1882 

Bronze plaque. 2o|xi6| in. 

A low relief of the sculptor's son, aged seventeen months. 

Ex-President Chester Allen Arthur 1882 

Bust. 

Commodore Vanderbilt 1882 

Bronze plaque. 

Two Sons of Cornelius Vanderbilt 1882 

Bronze plaque. i6x26iin. 

Miss Gertrude Vanderbilt at the age of seven 1882 

Bronze plaque. i6|x23| in. 

Dr. Alexander Hamilton Vinton 1883 

Bronze. Heroic size. Middle relief. Half-length figure. 
Emmanuel Church, Boston. 

Robert R. Randall 1884 

Bronze statue. Sailor's Snug Harbor, Staten Island. 

Mrs. Stanford White 1884 

Marble reUef. 23 x I2| in. 

Professor Asa Gray 1884 

Bronze plaque. Low relief. 35IX27 in. 
Botanic Gardens, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dr. Holland Monument 1884 

Springfield, Mass. 

Dr. Silas Weir Mitchell 1884 

Bronze plaque. 2o|xi6| in. 

xxxviii 



HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 

Portrait of a Lady 1884 

Bronze high relief. Three-quarter length figure. Right 
arm rests upon a piano. 

Charles Timothy Brooks 1884 

Memorial tablet in Channing Church, Newport, R. I. 

Two Angels Seated 1885 

Bronze. Stewart tomb at Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn. 

Dr. Henry W. Bellows 1885 

Bronze memorial tablet. Full length, middle relief, 

lettered, with decorated background. The Dr. McCosh, 

modelled later, is akin in design. 
Church of All Souls, New York. 

William Evarts Beaman 1885 

Bronze medallion. 18^ in. diameter. 

Chief Justice Waite 

Bust. Hall of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Son of Joseph H. Choate 1886 

Marble bust. 

Henry P. Haven 

Bronze medallion. New London Library. 

Angel on Tomb of Anna Maria Smith 1886 

A variation of the Morgan tomb angels and the Amor 
Caritas. Island Cemetery, Newport, R. L 

Fountain in Lincoln Park, Chicago 1886 

Abraham Lincoln. Standing figure Unveiled 1887 

Bronze statue, signed and dated 1887. Heroic size. Stand- 
ing before a chair in an attitude characteristic of Lincoln 
when rising to make a speech. The statue stands at the 
south end of Lincoln Park, in Chicago, the idea of an 
audience chamber being further carried out in the great 
circular stone exedra, sixty feet across, which surrounds 
the low pedestal, in the design of which Saint-Gaudens 
collaborated with Stanford White. 

Amor Caritas 1887 

Bronze. High relief. 8 ft. 9 in.; 4 ft. Luxembourg Gallery. 
The original idea of this was embodied in the figures on 
the Morgan tomb at Hartford, Conn. 

xxxix 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

Deacon Samuel Chapin ("The Puritan") . 1887 

Bronze statue in Springfield, Mass., signed and dated 
1887. Heroic size. Puritan costume, with a peak- 
crowned hat, long flowing cloak and carrying a staffs. 
Inscription: " 1505 Anno Domino 1675. Deacon Samuel 
Chapin. One or the founders of Springfield." 
A similar statue (not a replica) called " The Pilgrim " 
was made for the New England Society of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1905 and stands in City Hall Square, Phila- 
delphia. The head was remodelled and changed ; 
changes were also made in the cloak, and the book was 
reversed so that the lettering " Holy Bible" on the back 
is seen. 

Chester W. Chapin 

Bust. 

The head served as a study for the Deacon Chapin who 

was his ancestor and the prototype of the "Puritan" 

statue. 

Robert Louis Stevenson 1887 

Relief in rectangular form; signed and dated New York, 
September, 1887. Full-length figure, seen in profile, 
looking left, reclining in a bed, the lower limbs partly 
concealed by the coverlet; the left hand holding a manu- 
script, the knees being drawn up to support it, and the 
right hand poised in air, with a cigarette between the 
fingers. A border of ivy leaves and berries extends 
across the top of the plaque, with the inscription and 
signature written horizontally below it, the figure of the 
winged horse occurring between the first two stanzas 
of the inscription. 
The sittings for the head and shoulders took place in 
New York while Stevenson was ill there on his way to 
the Adirondacks. The hands were modelled from 
studies made at Manasquan just before he left for 
Samoa. 

Robert Louis Stevenson 1887 

Bronze circular medallion. Low relief. Signed and dated 
1887. Diameter (vertical) 35I in.; (horizontal) 34J 
in. Similar in design and inscription to the model de- 
scribed above, but differing as follows : Foot of bed and 
lower quarter of figure not visible; ivy border and verses of 
inscription made to conform to the circular shape of the 
medallion. 
A bronze reduction is in the Luxembourg. 

xl 



HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 

Robert Louis Stevenson : 1 887-1 902 

Rectangular bronze memorial tablet in Saint Giles's 
Cathedral, Edinburgh, Scotland. Low relief. Signed 
and dated 1 887-1 902. Height of relief, 5 ft. 7 in.; width, 
9 ft. 1 1 in. A variant of the former design, the figure 
being the same, but shown in full length, covered with 
a travelling rug in place of the coverlet, having a quill 
pen in hand in place of the cigarette, and resting upon 
a couch in place of the bed, with leaves of manuscript 
scattered upon the floor ; and instead of the ivy border 
extending across the top and drooping at sides of the 
relief, a garland of laurel interwoven at the ends with 
Scotch heather and Samoan hibiscus. The outline of a 
ship is shown in the lower right-hand corner. 

Mrs. Grover Cleveland 1887 

Bronze medallion. 

Two Lions in Siena Marble 1887 

Boston Public Library. 

William M. Chase 1888 

Bronze plaque. 2ifx292in. 

Children of Jacob H. Schiff 1888 

Bronze. Low relief. A marble repUca is in the Metro- 
politan Museum, New York, and a bronze reduction 
in the Luxembourg. 

William M. Evarts 1888 

Bronze plaque. 23 x io§ in. 

Bust of General Sherman 1888 

Eighteen sittings were given in 1887. The bust supplied 
material tor the head of Sherman on the equestrian statue 
at the entrance to Central Park, New York. 

Edwin Hubbell Chapin, D.D 

Bronze relief. 36|x32|in. 

Fourth Universalist Church, New York. 

Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer 1888 

Bronze plaque. 

A reduction is in the Luxemboure. 



'to* 



Oakes Ames 1888 

Large medallion. 

Judge Tracy 1888 

Plaque. 



xl 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

Kenyon Cox 1889 

Bronze plaque. 19^ x 7I in. 

Executed two years after the portrait painted by Mr. Kenyon 
Cox of Saint-Gaudens. 

Washington Medal 1889 

Bronze medal. Low relief. To commemorate the inaugura- 
tion of George Washington as first President of the United 
States. 

Dr. James McCosh 1889 

Bronze memorial tablet. Full length, left hand resting 

upon reading desk. 
Princeton University. 

Jules Bastien Lepage 1889 

Bronze plaque. 14^ x 19I in. Modelled when Bastien 
Lepage was finishing his "Joan of Arc." In return the 
artist painted a portrait of Saint-Gaudens, which was 
burnt at the fire in his Cornish studio in 1904. A re- 
duction is in the Luxembourg. 

Hollingsworth Memorial 1889 

Bronze. 5 ft. 9 in. x 2 ft. 92 in. Boston Museum. 

Miss Violet Sargent 1890 

Bronze plaque. Full length. 
Playing a guitar. 

Adams Monument, Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D. C. . 1891 
Bronze statue. Unsigned and undated. A female seated 
figure. The monument consists of a block of granite 
against which the figure leans, and which forms one side 
of an hexagonal plot of about twenty feet in diameter, 
enclosed in a clump of trees. Opposite and occupying 
three sides of the hexagon is a massive stone bench. 

Seal for the Public Library, Boston, Mass 1891 

Stone rectangular high relief. A shield bearing a book is 
supported on either side by nude figures of boys, each 
holding a torch. 

Study for the Head of "Diana" 1891 

On Madison Square Garden tower. 

Peter Cooper 1891 

Tablet in Cooper Union. 

Monument to A4rs. Hamilton Fish 1892 

Two figures adoring cross. 

In collaboration with Stanford White. 

xlii 



HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 

Diana 1892 

Bronze figure on the tower of Madison Square Garden. 
One of his few nudes. Originally the figure was much 
taller. Thinking it too large, Saint-Gaudens and Stan- 
ford White replaced it by the present smaller version. 
A large statue of Diana, modelled in 1892, was exhibited in 
bronze at the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, and now 
forms the weathervane for Montgomery Ward's tower 
on the Lake Front in Chicago. 

The Columbus Medal 1 892-1 893 

Modelled for the Chicago Exhibition of 1893 in commemo- 
ration of the 400th anniversary of the landing of Colum- 
bus. 

Charles Cotesworth Beaman 1894 

Bronze plaque. 26| x 15^ in. A reduction is in the Luxem- 
bourg. 

President Garfield Monument 1895 

Bust of Garfield and allegorical figure of the "Republic." 
Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. In collaboration with 
Stanford White. 

Tomb for Mr. Henry Nivins. Mount Auburn 1895 

Miss Annie Page 1895 

Bronze head. 

William Astor Chanler 1896 

Bronze bust. 

Martin Brimmer 1896 

Marble bust and medallion. 

Memorial to Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. . . . Unveiled 1897 
Bronze relief opposite the State House, Boston, Mass. 
Equestrian figure of Shaw surrounded by his black foot- 
soldiers, who are marching forward. A female figure, 
symbolising Death and Fame, floats above and a little 
in advance of the figure of Shaw, the position being nearly 
horizontal. The left arm is extended, palm upward, and 
the right arm clasps to the breast poppies and a laurel 
branch, the whole enveloped in sweeping draperies. The 
commission for the memorial to Colonel Shaw, com- 
mander of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment 
(colored troops), who fell at Fort Wagner, was given by 
the State of Massachusetts in 1884. The work, with its 
many modifications, extended over an interval of twelve 
years, the completed monument being unveiled in 1897. 

xliii 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

General John A. Logan 1^97 

Bronze equestrian statue. Chicago Lake Front. 

Peter Cooper 1897 

Seated bronze statue under canopy at the side of Cooper 
Union, New York. 

William Dean Howells and Daughter 1898 

Bronze plaque. 

A reduction is in the Luxembourg. 

Miss Mildred Howells 1898 

Bronze medallion. 

Charles A. Dana 1898 

Bronze low relief. 37I x 19! in. 

Maxwell Memorial 

Tablet on boulder in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. 

Mrs. Charles Russell Lowell 1899 

Marble. Low relief. 

Mrs. Charles C. Beaman 1900 

Bronze plaque. 

Hon. David Jayne Hill 1901 

Marble bust. 

Jacob Crowninshield Rogers 1901 

Medallion. 

Justice Horace Gray, United States Supreme Court .... 1901 
Bronze plaque. 

Governor Roger Wolcott 1901-1902 

Marble relief. 

Robert Charles Billings 1901 

Medallion. Boston Public Library. 

Mrs. John Chipman Gray 1902 

Bronze plaque. 

Senator Macmillan 1902 

Bust. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne MacVeagh 1902 

Bronze plaque. 

Governor Roswell P. Flower 1903 

Bronze statue. Watertown, N. Y. 

xliv 



HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 

Monument to General William Tecumseh Sherman. .Unveiled 1903 
Gilt bronze group. At the south entrance to Central Park, 
New York. Heroic size. Figure of General Sherman on 
horseback, in uniform. Before the horse and rider walks 
a winged female figure — Nike-Eirene, or Victory-Peace — 
laurel-crowned, right arm extended and holding in her 
left hand a palm branch. The studies for the head of 
Sherman were made from life in 1888, the commission for 
the group being received and work begun about 1892 and 
continued in Paris in 1897, and in 1901 at Cornish; the 
horse and rider, without the Victory, being exhibited at 
the Salon of the Champ de Mars in 1899, the whole in 
plaster at the Paris Exposition of 1900, and, with altera- 
tions, at the Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, in 1901. 
Eleven years in all of study and alteration elapsed before 
the group was finished and unveiled on Decoration Day, 
1903, at the south entrance to Central Park, New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Matthews 1904 

Plaque. 

Mrs. Charles W. Gould 1904 

Marble bust. 15J in. high. 

This bust was the result of studies of the same subject 
extending over several years, a marble relief being exe- 
cuted between the years 1884 and 1894, and a marble 
bust in the round in 1 894-1 895. 

Hon. John Hay 1904 

Marble bust. 

Dean Sage 1904 

Caricatures of Henry Adams, Charles A. Piatt and James Wall 

Finn 1904 

Bronze medallions. 

Marcus Daly 1905 

Bronze statue. Butte, Montana. 

Bronze Plaque 1905 

Low relief. 32I x 19I in. Commemorating the masque of 
"The Golden Bowl," given at Cornish to celebrate the 
twentieth anniversary of Saint-Gaudens's coming there. 

Greek Victory 1905 

Bronze head. Metropolitan Museum, New York. 

Greek Victory 1905 

Medal (head). 

xlv 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

The Pilgrim 1905 

Bronze statue. Philadelphia. 
(See page XXVIII) 

Charles Stewart Parnell 1906 

For Dublin, Ireland. 

Bronze statue, with right hand upraised standing in front 
of a lofty obelisk. 

Designs for the New United States Coinage 1907 

Double eagle, eagle and one cent piece. 

Frederic Ferris Thompson 1906 

Marble medallion. Teachers College, New York. 

William C. Whitney 1907 

Bust. 

Marcus A. Hanna 1907 

Bronze statue for Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sketch of Figure of Painting for Proposed Freer Gallery at 

Washington 1907 

Whistler Memorial at United States Military Academy, 

West Point, N. Y 190? 

Marble tablet. Low relief. Height, 21 ft., 2 in.; width, 3 ft. 
In collaboration with Mr. Henry Bacon. 

Abraham Lincoln (Seated Figure) I9°7 

Bronze statue. Heroic size. Seated in arm-chair, body and 
head directed to the front, head slightly lowered as if 
in thought; right hand open, palm down, on knee; left, 
closed and resting on arm of chair; feet, set squarely 
on circular base. Across the back of the chair and 
drooping to the floor, a flag. This was one of Saint- 
Gaudens's last statues, destined for Chicago by bequest 
of the late John Crerar of that city. 

Two Groups for Entrance to Boston Public Library . . . 1907 
One of four figures, the other of three. 

1. Law, Executive Power and two figures representing 
Love. 

2. Music, Labour and Science. 

The models were complete at the time of Saint-Gaudens's 
death, but not the enlargements. 

Eight Caryatides 1907 

For the Albright Gallery, Buffalo. 

Six were completely finished at the time of his death; two 
almost finished. 



xlv 



HIS WORKS: CHRONOLOGY 

Magee Fountain, Stele, Basin and Statue of Plenty .... 1907 
For Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. 

Rev. Phillips Brooks 1907 

For exterior of Trinity Church, Boston. The figure of 
Christ, half concealed in the shadow of a canopy, rests 
his fingers upon the shoulder of the preacher. 

The Baker Monument 1907 

Seated figure of Christ, with attendant angels. The sculptor 
was at work upon this du-ring his last illness. 

Mrs. Augustus Saint-Gaudens 1907 

Bronze relief. 36 x 21 in. Three-quarters length figure, in 
profile, turned to left ; in right hand a bowl of flowers, the 
left holding up the skirt of dress. Background of two 
Doric columns with landscape ; dog roughly sketched 
in lower left corner. 

Study for the Head of Christ 1907 

Marble head on square block of marble. 16 in. high. 
About three-quarters lite size. 



xlvii 



PHOTOGRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS 

OF THE WORKS OF 

AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 



i874 

WILLIAM MAXWELL EVARTS 

Marble bust. Height 23 in. This was his first commissioned portrait bust. 
The order was given in Rome, the modelhng being done in New York imme- 
diately after his return from Italy. 

In the possession of Miss Mary M. Evarts. 




Copyright iqoS by de II'. C. Ward 



i877 

WILLIAM G E D N E Y B U N C E 

Bronze plaque. Low relief. Height 6j in.; width 5', in. Boat in lower 
right-hand corner. 

In the possession ol .Mk. W . Cj. Bunce. 




Copyright igoS by ,1c \V . ('. Ward 



i879 

RODMAN DE KA^' GILDER 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height Iji in.; width 15I in. A detail from the 
group of " Richard Watson Gilder, Wife and Infant Son," but more fully 
carried out 

INSCRIPTJOX: RODMAN DE KAY GILDER. PARIS, SEPTEMBER, 
1879. 

In the possession of Mr. R. W. Gilder. 



,-^ 



X-- ?jf; 








Copyrighl igoS by di If. C 11 an/ 



i879 

DOCTOR WALTER CAR^' 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height gf in.; width Of in. At left, coat of arms. 
In the possession of Mr. Thomas Carv. 




Copyright itjote i>y dc 11. C Wurti 



i88o 

DR. HENRY SHIFF 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height loj in.; width n\ in. Figure of toad 
introduced at the right. 

INSCRIPTION^ in Italian. The translation reads: TO THE DEAR 
FRIEND DOCTOR HENRY SHIFF AT THE AGE OF FORTY-SEVEN. 
LOVER OF THE TOADS AND SMELLS OF ROME, DILETTANTE IN 
PHILOSOPHY AND THE FINE ARTS, ADMIRER OF THE FELINE TYPE: 
IN PARIS IN THE MONTH OF MAY OF THE YEAR MDCCCLXXX. 

In tile possession of Mrs. Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 
A reduction is in the Luxemhourg. 




Copyright iqoS hy rfc IT. C. Waril 



i88o 

JOHN S. SARGENT, R. A. 

Bronze medal, low relief. Diameter 24 in. 

The INSCRIPTION reads: MY FRIEND JOHN SARGENT. PARIS, JULY 
MDCCCLXXX, BRUTTO RITRATO. 

In the possession of Mrs. Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 







Copyright igoS by dc \V . C. Ward 



i88i 

CHILDREN OF PRESCOTT HALL 
BUTLER 

Bronze low relief. October, 1880 — March, 1881. Height 24 in.; width 
352 in. In upper left corner, an endless knot with legend "Dahit Dens His 
Quoque Finem." 

The INSCRIPTION reads: CHARLES STEWART BUTLER IN HIS 
FOURTH YEAR. LAWRENCE SMITH BUTLER IN HIS SIXTH YEAR. 
TO MY FRIEND PRESCOTT HALL BUTLER, SIXTH OF JULY, EIGHTEEN 
HUNDRED AND EIGHTY. MARCH TWENTY-SIXTH, EIGHTEEN HUN- 
DRED AND EIGHTY-ONE. 

In the possession of Mrs. P. H. Butler. 



i88i 

ADMIRAL DAVID GLASGOW 
FARRAGUT 

Bronze statue, heroic size, on decorated stone pedestal. I'^xliibited at the 
Salon of 1880, and unveiled in Madison Square Ciarden in New ^'ork City in 
1881. This was the first statue commissioned from Saint-Gaudens for a 
public place. Farragut is in the uniform of a United States Admiral. The 
stone pedestal forms a semicircular seat, divided by the pier upon which the 
figure stands, and terminating at either end in carved dolphins. Upon the 
central pier is a symbolic sword, plunged down through the waves which flow- 
across it and over two seated female figures, representing Courage and Loy- 
alty, carved in low relief at either side. The seat is raised three steps from 
the level of the park, and the space about its foot is paved with pebbles in 
which a bronze crab is sunk. 

The INSCRIPTION contains a biographical sketch ami the following appre- 
ciation : DAVID GLASGOW FARRAGUT. THAT THE MEMORY OF A 
DARING AND SAGACIOUS COMMANDER AND GENTLE GREAT-SOULED 
MAN, WHOSE LIFE FROM CHILDHOOD WAS GIVEN TO HIS COUNTRY, 
BUT WHO SERVED HER SUPREMELY IN THE WAR FOR THE UNION, 
MDCCCLXI-MDCCCLX V, MAY BE PRESERVED AND HONORED . . . HIS 
COUNTRYMEN HAVE SET UP THIS MONUMENT A. D. MDCCCL.X X XI. 
BORN . . . MDCCCI. DIED . . . MDCCCLXX. 



i88i 

MISS SARAH REDWOOD LEE 

Bronze plaque, low relief. 

INSCRIPTION: SARAH REDWOOD LEE AT THE AGE OV SIXTEEN. 

In the possession of Mrs. Charles Carroll Lee. 




MilMMHIliM 

Copyright looS by dr \V . C. Ward 



1 88 1 

SAMUEL G R A ^' WARD 

Bronze plaijuf. Heiglit iSl in.; width 14! in. 

INSCRIPTION : S.^Ml'EL GR.W WARD. NEW YORK, M,\Y, 

MDCCCLXXXI. 

In tile pos.sfssion of Mr. Thomas W. Ward. 
A reduction is in the Luxemhourg 




Copyright 190S by df W . C. Wanl 



i882 

HOMER SHIFF SAINT-GAUDENS 

Bronze low relief. Height 20j in. ; width l6'i in. 

INSCRIPTION : TO MV FRIEND DOCTOR HENRY SHIFF THIS 
PORTRAIT OF MY SON HOMER SHIFF S.-M NT-G.\ U D EN S AT THE AGE 
OF SEVENTEEN MONTHS. 

In the possession of Mrs. .Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 

A rejilica in marble was presented to the Metropolitan Museum of Art by 
Mr. Jacob H. Schift'. 

A bronze reduction is in the Luxembourg. 




Copyriglll lgo8 by de W. C. Ward 



1884 

MRS. STANFORD WHITE 

M:irbif middle relief, signed and dated, Febriiarv 7, 1884. 25 bv 12^ incbes. 




Ctipyrighl iijoS by Jc W . C U\ir,l 



1884 

PROFESSOR ASA GRAY 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height 355 in.; width 27 in. In upper right 
corner, within a wreath of flowers, three miniature books with word ve-ri- 
TAS on their pages. 

INSCRIPTION: ASA GRAY MDCCCLXXXtV. 

In the possession of Harvard University. 




Copyright 7go8 by lic \V. C. Ward 



1885 

DOCTOR HENRY WHITNEY 
BELLOWS 

Bronze memorial tahlet, niiddlf relief. Height 10 ft. 4 in.; width 4 ft. 5I in. 

INSCRIPTION: FORTY-THREE YEARS MINISTER OF THIS CHURCH, 
TO WHICH HE GAVE THE NAME ALL-SOULS. PRESIDENT OF THE 
UNITED STATES SANITARY COMMISSION FROM 1861 TO 1878. HENRY 
WHITNEY BELLOWS, D.D., BORN IN BOSTON JUNE IITH, 1814. DIED 
IN NEW YORK lANUAR'i, 1882. 

In the possession of the Trustees of All Souls (Unitarian) CInirch, New ^'ork. 




Copyright 1908 by de W. C. Ward 



1 88 7 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

Bronze statue. Heroic size. In Lincoln Paric, Chicago. 'I lie idea o( an 
audience-chamber is suggested by a circular stone exedra, sixty feet across, 
which surrounds the low pedestal, in the design of which Mr. Saint-Gaudens 
collaborated with the late Stanford White. The inscription includes an ex- 
tract from the Cooper Union speech of i860 : 

LET us HAVE FAITH THAT RIGHT MAKES MIGHT, AND IN THAT 
FAITH LET US TO THE END DARE TO DO OUR DUTY AS WE UNDER- 
STAND IT. 

Twenty years later, in 1907, the year of his death, Saint-Gaudens completed 
a statue of Lincoln seated, a gift by the late John Crerar to Chicago. 



188; 

AMOR C A R I T A S 

Hronze higli relief, in the Luxemhourg Ciallery, Paris. lUral height 8 ft. 
9 in.; width 4 ft. The sculptor repeated this figure with variations several 
times. The original idea was embodied in the figures on the Morgan tomb at 
Hartford, Conn., which were destro\ed hy fire. 




Copyright igo8 by ile W. C. W.iril 



i887 

DEACON SAMUEL C H A P I N 

("the puritan") 

Bronze statue in Springfield, Mass. Heroic size. Figure of a man walking; 
Puritan costume, witli a peak-crowned liat, long flowing cloak, and carrying 
a stafF. Branches of pine needles scattered underfoot. 

INSCRIPTION : 1595 ANNO DOMINI 1675. DEACON SAMUEL 
CHAPIN, ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF SPRINGFIELD. 

Thr Pilgnin, a variation of the above, was executed in 1905. 




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1 888 

WILLIAM MERRITT CHASE 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height 2l| in.; width 292 in. In the lower left 
corner is a medallion with design of winged horse. The clay model of this 
plaque, in somewhat different form, is represented on the sculptor's easel in 
Mr. Kenyon Cox's portrait of Saint-Gaudens. (See Frontispiece.) 

In the possession of Mr. W. M. Chase. 




BOSTON UNIVERSiTY 

COLlF«£ OF LIBERAL ART! 

LIBRARY 



i888 

CHILDREN OF JACOB H. SCHIFF 

Bronze low relief. Height 5 ft. gj in.; width 4 ft. 3 in. Sculptured frame 
effect of plinth. Columns and cornice hung with garlands. 

A marhle replica was presented to the Metropolitan Museum of Art h)- Mr. 
Jacob H. Schiff in 1906. 

A bronze reduction is in the Luxembourg. 








CopyrishI igoS *v ik W. C. Ward 



1 888 

GENERAL WILLIAM TECUM SEH 
SHERMAN 

Bronze bust. Total height 315 in. Modelled from life in eighteen sittings. 
This bust served as the study for the head of Sherman in the equestrian statue 
unveiled m 1903 in New ^'ork. 

In the possession of Mrs. Paul Thorndike. 





Copyrighl iqo8 by ,1c \V . C. Ward 



i889 

KEN YON COX 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height iQj in.; width 7;^ in. 

INSCRIPTION: KENYON cox, PAINTER, IN HIS THIRTY-THIRD 
YEAR, BY HIS FRIEND, AUGUSTUS SAINT-GA UDE N S, MDCCCLX X XIX. 

In the possession of Mr. Kenyon Cox. 

Executed two years after tiie portrait painted bv Mr. Kenyon Cox of 
Mr. Saint-Gaudens. 




Copyrighl igoS by de W. C. Ward 



1889 

WASHINGTON MEDAL 

Bronze medal, low relief. Diameter 45 in. 

(Obverse) Bust of Washington, side view, head in profile, directed left ; Con- 
tinental costume. At the right, the fasces of magistracy. Forming a border 
about the edge, thirteen stars. 

INSCRIPTION : GEORGE WASHINGTON, PATER PATRIAE. 
MDCCLXXXIX. 

(Reverse) Upper half, an American eagle, with wings spread, claws holding 
arrows and olive branch bearing shield with legend "E Pluribus Unum." 
Lower left, coat of arms of New ^'ork State. Thirty-eight stars forming 
border. 

INSCRIPTION : TO COMMEMORATE THE INAUGURATION OF 
GEORGE WASHINGTON AS FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA AT NEW YORK APRIL XXX, MDCCLXXXIX, BY AUTHORITY 
OF THE COMMITTEE ON CELEBRATION, WASHINGTON MEDAL, NEW 
YORK, APRIL XXX, MDCCCLXXXIX. 



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Copyright ir;oS by ilr W . C. Ward 



1889 

DOCTOR JAMES McCOSH 

Bronze memorial tablet, middle relief. Height 8 feet 3 J in. ; width 4 ft. 7 J in. 

INSCRIPTION: JAMES MCCOSH, D.D., LL.D., FOR TWENTY YEARS 
PRESIDENT OF PRINCETON COLLEGE, OCTOBER XXVII, MDCCCLXVIII- 
JUNE XX, MDCCCLXXXVIII. ERECTED IN HIS HONOR BY THE CLASS 
OF MDCCCLXXIX. JUNE XVIII, MDCCCLXXXIX. 

In the possession of Princeton University. 




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.UNE-XViti- I 

/A-D-oaguxxxix- 1 





Copyright igoS /),v rff H'. C. Il'tift/ 



1 889 

JULES BASTI EN-LEPAGE 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height 14^ in.; width igh in. 

INSCRIPTION: JULES BASTIEN-LEPAGE AETATIS XXXI. PARIS 
MDCCCLXXX. 

In tlie possession of Mrs. Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 
A reduction is in the Luxembourg. 




Copyright 190S by de W. C. Ward 



iSgi 

ADAMS M O N U M E N T 

ROCK CREEK CEMETERY 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Bronze statue, unsigned and undated. 

The monument, wliicli m enclosed in a clump of trees, consists of a block of 
granite against which the figure leans, and which forms one side of an 
hexagonal plot of about twenty feet in diameter. Opposite and occupying 
three sides of the hexagon is a stone bench. The figure has been \ariously 
interpreted, although Saint-Gaudens gave no name to it. 



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Fn>m It Copley Print. Cnpyright iSgg by Curtis a' Cameron 



1892 

DIANA 

Bronze figure, surmounting the Madison Square Garden tower. The figure 
was originally much larger Thinking it too large, Saint-Gaudens, in con- 
sultation with Stanford White, the architect of the tower, removed the figure 
and replaced it by the present smaller version. 

A large statue of Diana, modelled in 1892, was exhibited in bronze at the 
World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, and now forms the weathervane for Mont- 
gomery Ward's tower on the Lake Front in Chicago. 




Ciipyrighl 1908 by dc \V . C. Ward 



1894 

CHARLES CO! ES WORTH BEAMAN 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height 265 in.; width 15J in. 

INSCRIPTION: MDCCCLX.XXIV. CHARLES COTESWORTH BEAMAN, 
BY HIS FRIEND, AUGUSTUS S AINT-G A U DENS. 

In the possession of Mrs. C. C. Beaman. 
A reduction is in the Luxembourg. 




Copyright igo8 by lii- IT. C. Ward 



1 895 

GARFIELD MONUMENT 

Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. 

A tall marble quadrilateral stele with Doric pilasters at the angles, supporting 
an entablature upon which rests the bust. Below in a niche stands the figure 
of the Republic. 

INSCRIPTION {on shiflJ): JAMES ABRAM GARFIELD, PRESIDENT 
OF THE UNITED STATES, MDCCCL.XXXI. 



i897 

MEMORIAL TO 
ROBERT GOULD SHAW 

Bronze relief. Boston Common. 

INSCRIPTION (to the right of the floating figure of Death or Fame): 
OMNIA RELINQUIT SERVARE REMPUBLICAM. 

INSCRIPTION {beneath the relief): Robert gould shaw. killed 

WHILE LEADING THE ASSAULT ON FORT WAGNER. JULY TWENTY- 
THIRD, EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-THREE. 

The commission tor this memorial to Colonel Shaw, Commander of the 
Fiftv-fourth Massachusetts Regiment (colored troops), who fell at Fort 
Wagner, was given to Saint-Gaudens by the State of Massachusetts in 1884. 
The work, with its manv modifications, extended over an interval of twelve 
years, the completed monument being unveiled in 1897. 



DETAIL FROM THE SHAW 
MONUMENT 




Copyright igoS by df W. C. Ward 



i897 

PETER COOPER 

Cooper Union, New York City 

INSCRIPTION: ERECTED BY THE CITIZENS OF NEW YORK IN 
GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE OF PETER COOPER, FOUNDER OF THE 
COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART, 
ANNO DOMINI MDCCCXCVII. 

Saint-Gaudens attended classes at tlie Cooper Union in his youth. 







Copyright 190S by df \V . C. Ward 



PETER COOPER 



Head o! the bronze statue. Height 26 In. 




Copyright 1908 hy de W. C. Ward 



1898 

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS AND 
MISS HOWELLS 

Bronze plaijue, low relief. 

INSCRIPTION: MILDRED AND WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS, NEW 
YORK MDCCCXCVIII. FROM AUGUSTUS S AINT-G A UDE NS. 

In the possession of Mr. W. D. Howells. 
A replica is in the Luxembourg. 



1898 

CHARLES ANDERSON DANA 

Bronze low relief. Height 37! in. ; width 19I in. 

INSCRIPTION : CHARLES .ANDERSON DANA, MDCCC.XIX- 
MDCCCXCVII. 

In the possession of Mr. William M. Laffan. 




Copyright igoS by de W. C. Ward 



1 899 

JOSEPHINE SHAW LOWELL 

Marble low relief. 

Josephine Sliaw Lowell. Widow of General Charles Russell Lowell. De- 
cember l6, 1843-October 12, 1905. 

In the possession of Miss Carlotta Russell Lowell. 




CopyrishI lc;0S l>y dc If. C - Ward 



igoi 

HORACE GRAY, ASSOCIATE JUSTICE 
OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME 
COURT 

Bronze plaque, low relief. Height 29J in. ; width 32 7-10 in. Rohe of 
office. In left upper corner seal of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

INSCRIPTION: HORACE GRAY IN HIS SEVENTY-FOURTH YEAR. 
WASHINGTON, D. C, APRIL, MDCCCCI. MAJOR HAEREDITAS VENIT A JURE 
ET LEGIBUS. 

In the possession of Mrs. Horace Gray. 




Copyright 190S by i!c IT. C. Ward 



1902 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON 

Rectangular bronze memorial tablet in Saint Giles's Cathedral, Edinburgh, 
Scotland; low relief, signed and dated 1887-1902. Height 7 ft. 2 in.; width 
9 ft. 2 in. A variant, but much larger, of the relief made in 1887, when 
Stevenson was delayed in New York by illness on his way to the Adirondacks. 
The sittings for the head and shoulders took place in New ^'ork. The hands 
were modelled from studies made at Alanasquan, just before Stevenson left 
for Samoa. The figure is here shown in full length, covered with a travel- 
ling-rug in place of the coverlet, having a quill pen in hand in place of a 
cigarette, and resting upon a couch in place of the bed, with leaves of manu- 
script scattered upon the floor, and instead of the ivy border, extending 
across the top and drooping at sides of the relief, a garland of laurel inter- 
woven at the ends with Scotch heather and Samoan hibiscus. The outhne 
of a ship is shown in the lower right corner. 

INSCRIPTION {/ihove, Stevenson's "Prayer"): GIVE US GRACE AND 
STRENGTH TO FORBE.'VR AND TO PERSEVERE. GIVE US COURAGE 
AND GAIETY, AND THE QUIET MIND. SPARE TO US OUR FRIENDS, 
SOFTEN TO US OUR ENEMIES. BLESS US, IF IT MAY BE, IN ALL OUR 
INNOCENT ENDEAVOURS. IF IT MAY NOT, GIVE US THE STRENGTH 
TO ENCOUNTER THAT WHICH IS TO COME, THAT WE MAY BE BRAVE 
IN PERIL, CONSTANT IN TRIBULATION, TEMPERATE IN WRATH, AND 
IN ALL CHANGES OF FORTUNE, AND DOWN TO THE GATES OF DEATH, 
LOYAL AND LOVING TO ONE ANOTHER. 

{On plinth, below relief proper): ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON, born at 

VIII HOWARD PLACE, EDINBURGH, NOVEMBER XIII, MDCCCL, DIED 
AT VAILIMA, ISLAND OF UPOLU, SAMOA, DECEMBER III, MDCCCXCIV. 
THIS MEMORI.\L IS ERECTED IN HIS HONOUR BY READERS IN ALL 
QUARTERS OF THE WORLD WHO ADMIRE HIM AS A MASTER OF 
ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH LETTERS, AND TO WHOM HIS CONSTANCY 
UNDER INFIRMITY AND SUFFERING, AND HIS SPIRIT OF MIRTH, 
COURAGE AND LOVE, HAVE ENDEARED HIS NAME. 

"Under the wide and starry sky 
Dig the grave and let me lie, 
Glad did I live and gladly die. 
And I laid me down with a will. 

"This be the verse you grave for me: 
Here he lies where he longed to be; 
Home is the sailor, home from the sea, 
And the hunter home from the hill." 




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1902 

MR. & MRS. WAYNE M a c V E A G H 

Bronze low relief. Height 3 ft. 2J in. ; width 4 ft. g in. Two figures at either 
end of long bench placed under a pine tree. 



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1903 

MONUMENT TO GENERAL 
WILLIAM TECUM SEH SHERMAN 

Bronze group. South entrance to Central Park, New \ ork. Figure ot Gen- 
eral Sherman on horseback, in uniform. Before the horse and rider walks a 
winged female figure — Nike-Eirene, or Victory-Peace — laurel-crowned, right 
arm extended and holding in her left hand a palm branch. 

The studies for the head of Sherman were made from life in 1S88, the com- 
mission for the group was received and work begun about 1892 and contmued 
in Paris in 1897; the horse and rider without the Victory were exhibited at 
the Salon of the Champ de Mars in 1899, the whole in plaster at the Paris 
Exposition of 1900, and, with alterations, at the Pan-American Exposition, 
Buffalo, in 1901. Eleven vears in all of study and alteration elapsed before 
the group was finished and unveiled on Decoration Day, 1903, at the south 
entrance to Central Park, New ^'ork. 




Copyright 1905 by de W . C. Ward 



1905 

SHERMAN MONUMENT: 
LATER STUDY FOR THE 
HEAD OF VICTORY 

Bronze head. Height of head 8j in. ; of pedestal 42 in. 

INSCRIPTION: NIKH-EIPHNH ( V ICTOR Y-PE AC e) 

Although Saint-Gaudens had a preference for this head, he did not consider 
that it accorded so well with the statue as the first study. The latter was used 
for the equestrian statue, and the profile of this second study was later repro- 
duced in relief as the model for the new cent and the ten-dollar coin. 




(_ .'(•yngii! HJ05 ny ,h- 11'. C. IWinl 



1905 

THE PILGRIM 

Erected in City Hall Square, Philadelphia, in 1905. 

A commission from the New England Society of Pennsylvania, which asked 
for a replica of The Puntnn; but the sculptor gave it what is virtually a 
new work, which he called The Pilgrim. 

The head was remodelled and changed and the staff was advanced; changes 
were also made in the cloak, and the book was reversed so that the lettering 
" Holy Bible " on the back is seen. 



1905 

PLAQUE COMMEMORATIVE OF 
THE CORNISH CELEBRATION 
JUNE 23, 1905 

Bronze plaque in low relief. Height 32! in.; widtli iQj in. Design : Tem- 
ple of Love. 

INSCRIPTION: (Names of participants.) {On altar) amor vincit 

... IN AFFECTIONATE REMEMBRANCE OF THE CELEBRATION OF 
JUNE XXIII, MCMV. AUGUSTA AND AUGUSTUS S AINT-G AUDE NS. 

In the possession of Mrs. Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 

The "Masque of the Golden Bowl" was performed by the residents to cele- 
brate the twentieth anniversary of the year Mr. and Mrs. Saint-Gaudens first 
made Cornish their summer home. 




Copyright iQoS by de 11*. C. Ward 



I go 7 

PLASTER MODELS FOR UNITED 
STATES NEW COINAGE 

(0 

Head of woman, in profile, wearing olive wreath. Above, thirteen stars. 
Diameter of plaster model ll| in. Unused design, originall\- intended for 
one-cent piece. 





Copyright 1908 by de W. C. Ward 



1907 

PLASTER MODELS FOR UNITED 
STATES NEW COINAGE {Coutimwd) 

Similar to No. I, with Indian head-dress substituted for oli\e-\vreath, and 
with margin of rehef lowered. Depth I if in. 

Design for obverse of ten-dollar gold piece. 




Copyright igo8 by de 11'. C. Ward 



igo; 

PLASTER MODELS FOR UNITED 
STATES NEW COINAGE {Contnuicd) 

ii) 

American eagle, standing; arrows and olive branch in claws. In upper right 
field, INSCRIPTION: E PLURiBus uNUM. Legend: united states 
OF AMERICA. Depth I2j in. 

Design intended for reverse of the twenty - dollar gold piece, but used 
for the ten. 




Copyright igo8 by dc \V . C. Ward 



1907 

PLASTER MODELS FOR UNITED 
STATES NEW COINAGE (Contimuul) 

(4) 

Full-length figure of winged woman, standing; flowing liair, Indian head- 
dress, classic robe; torch in right hand, olive branch in left; left foot raised 
on a rock against which is an oak branch. In the lower left field a small 
sketch of the Capitol building, with rising sun; lower right field, MCMVii. 
Border of forty-six stars. Edge bevelled. Depth 123 in. 

Original idea for obverse of twenty-dollar gold piece. 




Copyright igoS by dc \V . C. Ward 



PLASTER MODELS FOR UNITED 
STATES NEW COINAGE {Conunned) 

(5) 

Similar to No. 4, but without wings or iiead-dress for the figure; Capitol 
building enlarged, rays of sun lengthened and extended across from left to 
right. Border of stars nearer centre, leaving wider margin. Edge, thirteen 
stars, with legend e pluribus unum. Depth 125 in. 

Design for obverse of twent\-dollar gold jiiece. 




Copyright igoS by dc W . C. U'urd 



1907 

PLASTER MODELS FOR UNITED 
STATES NEW COINAGE {Continued) 

(6) 

American eagle, flying- Below, rising sun, with rays extending to margin. 

LEGEND: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TWENTY DOLLARS. 

Depth 132 in. 

Design intended for one-cent piece, but used for twenty-dollar piece. 

From plaster models in the possession of Mrs. Augustus Saint-Gaudens. 




CofyriglU igoS by dc W. C. WarJ 



'9° 7 

W H I S T L P: R M E M () R I A L A T UNITED 
STATES MILITARY' ACADEMY' 

WEST POINT, N . Y . 

Marble tablet, low relief". Height 21 ft. 2 in. ; widtli 3 ft. Creek torches at 
sides, with a small wreath above and Whistler's butterfly device below. 

INSCRIPTION (,:vl,,ut from ffhist/er's "Tf,, O'C/otk"): TO JAMES 
MCNEILL WHISTLER, M DCCCX XX I V-MCMI 1 1. THE STORY OF THE 
BEAUTIFUL IS ALREADY COMPLETE, HEWN IN THE MARBLES OF THE 
I'ARTHENON AND BROIDERED WITH THE BIRDS UPON THE FAN OF 
HOKUSAI. 





Ci'pyrighl lyoS iy <lf W. C. War,/ 



I go; 

S T U D ^' FOR T H I-: H E A D OF C M R I S T 

Marble head, on square block of marble. Toral beight l6 in. 

In the possession of Mrs. Augustus S.mnt-Cj.'vudens. 

Ibis, and the low-relief |")la(]ue of bis wife, were tbe last pieces of sculpture 
worked upon b\- Saint-( laudens with bis own bands. 




Cupyriglil KjoS by ,1c IF. C. Ward 



AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS 

From a pli<itngrapli In' nr W. C". \\ aki) 




Copyright iqoS by de II'. C. Ward 



fiifliliiiiii 

-J'-^-i?^ 00314 B^&3 



Do not remove 



charge slip from this pocket 

if shp is lost please return book 

directly to a circulation staff member. 




iJoston University Libraries 

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Boston, Massachusetts 02215